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Environmental Quality Incentives Program

2018 EQIP Web HeaderThe Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) is a voluntary conservation program that helps agricultural producers in a manner that promotes agricultural production and environmental quality as compatible goals. Through EQIP, agricultural producers receive financial and technical assistance to implement structural and management conservation practices that optimize environmental benefits on working agricultural land.

Accepting Applications

EQIP applications are accepted on a continuous basis, however, NRCS establishes application "cut-off" or submission deadline dates for evaluation, ranking and approval of eligible applications. EQIP is open to all eligible agricultural producers and submitted applications may be considered or evaluated in multiple funding pool opportunities. The following document describes how to apply for Farm Bill programs or visit the following website: Get started with NRCS national page.

Learn how to Get Started with NRCS

To apply for EQIP, contact your local service center.

CPA-1200 NRCS Conservation Program Application (PDF, 49KB) 

Eligibility

Agricultural producers and owners of non-industrial private forest land and Tribes are eligible to apply for EQIP. Eligible land includes cropland, rangeland, pastureland, non-industrial private forest land and other farm or ranch lands.

Applicants must:

  1. Control or own eligible land
  2. Comply with adjusted gross income limitation (AGI) provisions
  3. Be in compliance with the highly erodible land and wetland conservation requirements
  4. Develop an NRCS EQIP plan of operations

Additional restrictions and program requirements may apply.

Participant Responsibilities

Applicants are responsible for completing and filing all application and eligibility paperwork as required. If funded, participants are required to sign a contract and agree to implement the planned conservation practices to NRCS standards and specifications as scheduled.

Socially Disadvantaged, Beginning, and Limited Resource Farmers/Ranchers, Military Veteran Farmers

The 2014 Farm Bill continues to address the unique circumstances and concerns of socially disadvantaged farmers and ranchers, as well as beginning and limited resource farmers and ranchers and Veteran Farmers. It provides for voluntary participation, offers incentives, and focuses on equity in accessing U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) programs and services. Enhancements include increased payment rates and advance payments of up to 50 percent to purchase materials and services needed to implement conservation practices included in their EQIP contract.

Colorado is committed to reaching out to Historically Underserved individuals and groups. Historically Underserved participants may also receive higher payment rates in addition to being considered in high priority funding pools.  See the Small & Limited and Beginning Farmers and Ranchers page for the NRCS definition of the Historically Underserved.

National and State Priorities

The following national priorities, consistent with statutory resources concerns that include soil, water, wildlife, air quality, and related natural resource concerns, may be used in EQIP implementation:

  • Reductions of nonpoint source pollution, such as nutrients, sediment, pesticides, or excess salinity in impaired watersheds consistent with total maximum daily loads (TMDL) where available; the reduction of surface and groundwater contamination; and the reduction of contamination from agricultural sources, such as animal feeding operations.
  • Conservation of ground and surface water resources.
  • Reduction of emissions, such as particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, volatile organic compounds, and ozone precursors and depleters that contribute to air quality impairment violations of National Ambient Air Quality Standards.
  • Reduction in soil erosion and sedimentation from unacceptable levels on agricultural land.
  • Promotion of at-risk species habitat conservation including development and improvement of wildlife habitat.
  • Energy conservation to help save fuel, improve efficiency of water use, maintain production, and protect soil and water resources by more efficiently using fertilizers and pesticides, and
  • Biological carbon storage and sequestration.

In addition, Colorado has identified the following priorities:

  • Water Quality and Quantity: irrigation systems, water control structures and irrigation water management
  • Grazing management: fencing, stockwater systems, range and pasture planting
  • Nutrient management: manure storage structures, planned nutrient applications, soil testing
  • Soil Health: conservation crop rotation, cover crops and conservation tillage
  • Wildlife habitat enhancement: buffer practices, upland wildlife habitat establishment
  • Forest Health: forest timber removal and woody residue treatment

Decision Making Process for EQIP

Input from Outside Groups, Agencies, and Citizens: The list of eligible practices in Colorado, payment rates and limits, eligible resource concerns, and state scoring criteria are developed based on input and recommendations from the State Technical Committee (STC). The STC is made up of representatives from various agribusiness, producer groups, conservation organizations, and federal, state, and tribal government agency representatives.

The priorities set at the state and county level are those that the STC and LWG respectively determined were of the greatest need and would have the greatest positive environmental impact. The scoring process at both the state and local level was developed in order to select those projects that would provide the greatest environmental benefit, and therefore provide the greatest public good.

Fiscal Year 2019 EQIP Deadlines

Applications submitted by October 19, 2018 will be evaluated to be considered for funding in fiscal year (FY) 2019. Applications received after that date will be accepted and evaluated for future rounds of funding.

Visit your local USDA Service Center to apply, or visit Get Started with NRCS.  

General EQIP​ Screening

Colorado EQIP Funding Pools/Ranking Documents and Screening Tools

Air Quality Initiative | Conservation Activity Plan | High Tunnel | National Water Quality Initiative | On-Farm Energy | Organic Initiative |  Strikeforce | WLFW Cutthroat Trout |  WLFW Sage Grouse Initiative | WLFW Southwestern Willow Flycatcher  |  Disaster Relief                                                     

Colorado Funding Pool

(links to more information)

Description

FY19 Ranking and Screening Criteria

GENERAL
FUND POOL
GENERAL
FUND POOL
GENERAL
FUND POOL

Air Quality Initiative (AQI)

The CO Air Quality Initiative seeks to address nitrogen (N) loss to the atmosphere in an effort to reduce air pollution and deposition. The key driving force behind this is the N deposition in Rocky Mountain National Park (RMNP) where the tundra areas above tree line have shown large increases in N deposition, which has altered
the plant communities from moss and moss-like plants to grass and grass-like plants. This change is a violation of NPS park classification where parks must be maintained or improved based on the condition at time of designation as a National Park. Agriculture, especially in eastern and northeastern Colorado, has been identified as a significant contributor to nitrogen deposition in RMNP. 

Applicable Geographic Region:
Colorado AQI Eligible Counties map

GENERAL SCREENING

AQI Screening

Animal Waste Management

Resource concerns related to the storage, treatment, and management of animal waste.

Applicable Geographic Region:
Statewide

GENERAL SCREENING

Animal Waste - RANKING

Beginning, Limited Resource, and Socially Disadvantaged Farmer/Rancher

Funding opportunity that addresses the unique circumstances and concerns of socially disadvantaged farmers and ranchers, as well as beginning and limited resource farmers and ranchers. It provides for voluntary participation, offers incentives, and focuses on equity in accessing U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) programs and services.

Applicable Geographic Region:
Statewide

GENERAL SCREENING

Beginning/Limited Resource Farmer - Grazing Land Health - RANKING

Beginning/Limited Resource Farmer - Cropland - RANKING

Beginning/Limited Resource Farmer - Irrigated Pasture/Hayland - RANKING

Socially Disadvantaged Farmer/Rancher - Grazing Land Health - RANKING

Socially Disadvantaged Farmer/Rancher - Cropland - RANKING

Socially Disadvantaged Farmer/Rancher -Irrigated Pasture/Hayland - RANKING

Conservation Activity Plan (CAP)

EQIP funding is available for the development of a Conservation Activity Plan (CAP). A CAP can be developed for producers to identify conservation practices needed to address a specific natural resource need. Typically, these plans are specific to certain kinds of land use such as transitioning to organic operations, grazing land, forest land, or can also address a specific resource need such a plan for management of nutrients.

Applicable Geographic Region:
Statewide

 

CAPS RANKING

 

Disaster Relief

  • 416 Fire
  • Lake Christine Fire
  • Spring Creek Fire

EQIP Funding is available to help private landowners impacted by the 2018 wildfires across Colorado. 

Applicable Geographic Region:
La Plata County, Eagle County, Huerfano County and Costilla County

Disaster Recovery -SCREENING

Disaster Recovery - RANKING

Forest Health

  • Denver Water North
  • Denver Water Middle
  • Denver Water South

Funding is for producers with non-industrial private forest land to address forest health and mitigate the risks of wildfire.

Applicable Geographic Region:
Forest Watershed Resilience Project map

General SCREENING

North - RANKING

Middle - RANKING

South - RANKING

High Tunnel

The purpose of the High Tunnel System for crops is to assist producers to extend the growing season for high value crops in an environmentally safe manner. The practice has the potential to assist producers to address resource concerns by improving plant quality, improving soil quality, and reducing nutrient and pesticide transport.

Applicable Geographic Region:
Statewide

GENERAL SCREENING

High Tunnel - RANKING

National Water Quality Initiative (NWQI)

The National Water Quality Initiative (NWQI) is a joint initiative with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to address sources of water pollution including nutrients, sediment, pesticides, and pathogens related to agricultural production. Watersheds are selected to receive targeted, long –term investment to accelerate voluntary conservation efforts to improve water quality.

Applicable Geographic Region:
NWQI Upper Grape Creek Watershed map

NWQI - SCREENING 

NWQI RANKING

On-Farm Energy

The Agricultural Act of 2014 Section 2201 (16 U.S. Code Section 3839aa) authorizes the use of EQIP to address energy conservation. The initiative is designed to assist producers in two ways:

  1. Identify ways to reduce energy use on their farms through development of a Conservation Activity Plan (CAP) 128 Agricultural Energy Management Plan (AgEMP), also known as an on- farm energy audit.
  2. Provide assistance to implement various recommended measures using conservation practice standards that address inefficient use of on-farm energy.

Applicable Geographic Region:
Statewide

On-Farm Energy Screening

On-Farm Energy - RANKING

Organic Initiative

Through the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) NOI, NRCS will assist eligible producers with installation of conservation practices on agricultural operations related to organic production. NRCS has determined that this definition includes certified organic producers and producers who are transitioning to become certified organic. Eligible applicants also include producers who fall under the exemption category in the National Organic Program (NOP) regulation.

 

  • Certified organic producers must provide NRCS with a copy of their USDA NOP organic certificate or proof of good standing from a USDA-accredited certifying agent; certification must be maintained for the life of the contract.
  • Exempt producers who are selling less than $5,000 a year in organic agricultural products are exempt from NOP’s certification. Exempt organic producers are eligible for the EQIP Organic Initiative provided that they self-certify that they agree to develop and implement an organic system plan (OSP) as required by the NOP. Applications should be ranked with transitioning producers.
  • Transitioning to organic must self-certify that they agree to develop and implement an OSP as required by the NOP.

Applicable Geographic Region:
Statewide

General SCREENING

Self Certification

Regional Conservation Partnership Program (RCPP)

  • Colorado River Headwaters
  • Colorado River Headwaters
  • Cattleman Outcomes for Greater Sage Grouse
  • Colorado Pressurized Irrigation Small Hydropower Partnership Project
The Regional Conservation Partnership Program (RCPP) encourages partners to join in efforts with producers to increase the restoration and sustainable use of soil, water, wildlife and related natural resources on regional or watershed scales. Through the program, NRCS and its partners help producers install and maintain conservation activities in selected project areas.   

Salinity

  • Salinity Wildlife Habitat Improvement
  • Salinity Colorado River Basin- Outside Project Area

Salinity - The program reduces salinity preventing salts from dissolving and mixing with the river's flow. Irrigation improvements and vegetation management reduce water available to transport salts vertically, laterally and on the soil surface. Point sources, such as saline springs are also controlled. A long term, interstate and interagency public/private partnership effort is being carried out to reduce the amount of salts in the river and its associated impacts in the basin.

Wildlife Habitat Improvement - requires that within designated project areas, all wildlife habitat values lost due to the irrigation improvements will be replaced.

Outside Project Area - utilizes small amounts of designated salinity funding to cost-share individual irrigation improvement projects within the Colorado River basin outside of designated salinity control units to accomplish additional salinity control. 

Applicable Geographic Region:
Salinity project area map

General SCREENING

Salinity Wildlife Habitat Improvement - RANKING

Salinity Colorado River Basin- Outside Project Area - RANKING

Strikeforce

  • Ute Mountain Ute Tribe
  • Southern Ute Tribe
  • Acequia
  • ​Ark. River Selenium

Through StrikeForce, NRCS is working with more farmers and ranchers than ever in communities that face persistent poverty. Specific funding is being used to increase awareness and use of USDA programs in historically underserved customer areas.

Applicable Geographic Region:
Ark. River Selenium, Ute Mountain Ute Tribal Lands, Southern Ute Tribal Lands, Acequia Lands

Arkansas River Selenium Screening

General SCREENING (Ute Mountain Ute, Southern Ute, Acequia)

Ute Mountain Ute Tribe - RANKING 

Southern Ute Tribe - RANKING

Acequia - RANKING

Selenium - RANKING

WaterSMART

NRCS provides support for on-farm water efficiency improvements for landowners in Henrylyn Irrigation District.

Applicable Geographic Region:
WaterSMART Project Area map

WaterSMART - SCREENING

WaterSMART - RANKING

Wildlife Habitat

A priority of EQIP is for the promotion of at-risk species habitat conservation. The Wildlife Habitat funding pool is available to Colorado producers who will restore, develop, or enhance wildlife habitat.

Applicable Geographic Region:
Statewide

Wildlife Habitat - RANKING

Wildlife Habitat - RANKING

WLFW Cutthroat Trout

Working Lands for Wildlife (WLFW) is a partnership that leverages capabilities and resources, targets assistance where it is most needed, cooperatively engages State and local partners, and works collaboratively with agricultural producers, forest land managers, and Tribes. NRCS and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) have selected at-risk species whose decline can be reversed given sufficient resources and landowner participation. 

Through this Working Lands for Wildlife (WLFW) effort NRCS Colorado is working with landowners and partner organizations to increase drought resiliency and habitat conditions across the native cutthroat trout landscape to benefit agricultural operations, rural communities and fish and wildlife habitat. Project partners are working together to develop on-the-ground projects that strategically restore stream and riparian functions, protect important cold water springs, streams and groundwater exchange, and enhance floodplain wet meadow habitats, all of which will improve stream flows and conditions for the agricultural community and wildlife. 

Three native cutthroat trout species occur in Colorado and are part of this initiative:

  • Colorado River cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii pleuriticus)
  • Greenback cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki stomias)
  • Rio Grande cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii virginalis)

Applicable Geographic Region:
Cutthroat Trout Eligible Counties Map

Cutthroat Trout Screening

Cutthroat Trout - RANKING

WLFW Sage Grouse Initiative

Working Lands for Wildlife (WLFW) is a partnership that leverages capabilities and resources, targets assistance where it is most needed, cooperatively engages State and local partners, and works collaboratively with agricultural producers, forest land managers, and Tribes. NRCS and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) have selected at-risk species whose decline can be reversed given sufficient resources and landowner participation. 

This Working Lands for Wildlife (WLFW) initiative focuses on coordination with ranchers to improve habitat for sage-grouse and promote healthy grazing land conservation practices.

Sage Grouse Initiative funds must be used to address the primary sage grouse resource concerns to reduce threats to sage-grouse habitat and improve rangeland health and stability.


Applicable Geographic Region:
SGI Eligible Counties Map

General SCREENING

SGI Ranking

WLFW Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (SWF)

Working Lands for Wildlife (WLFW) is a partnership that leverages capabilities and resources, targets assistance where it is most needed, cooperatively engages State and local partners, and works collaboratively with agricultural producers, forest land managers, and Tribes. NRCS and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) have selected at-risk species whose decline can be reversed given sufficient resources and landowner participation. 

EQIP SWFI funds must be used to create, improve, and expand the habitat and current range of the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher.

Applicable Geographic Region:
SWFI Eligibility Map

SWF SCREENING

SWF - RANKING

TARGETED
CONSERVATION
FUND POOLS (TCP)

Colorado landowners plan and implement locally developed conservation projects that address identified priority resource concerns within the state.

This process supports and is fueled by the local work-group process and allows for a more efficient and effective impact on the natural resource concern because the financial and technical assistance are more concentrated.

TARGETED
CONSERVATION
FUND POOLS (TCP)

Bessemer
Ditch lateral Enhancement

This project will result in:

1. Irrigation effectiveness improvement.
2. Water quality improvement.
3. Reduction of noxious and other weed seed dispersal by open air ditch systems
4. Ease of use and labor savings by producers. 
5. Better relations between urban and rural landowners. 

Applicable Geographic Region:
Pueblo County

 

TCP - SCREENING

Bessemer Ditch lateral Enhancement - RANKING

Dye Reservoir -
Arkansas River

This project will result in:

1. 5-20% irrigation water application efficiency depending on the practice implemented,

2. reduction of deep water percolation which will limit the pesticides, nutrients, salinity, and selenium in ground water and return flows, and

3. reduction of tail water runoff which will limit the pesticides, nutrients, salinity, and selenium in the surface water system.

Applicable Geographic Region:
Otero County

Dye Reservoir - SCREENING

Dye Reservoir- Arkansas River - RANKING

Forest Health & Resiliency- Buffer
Zone to FS

High Desert and Mancos CD

This project will re-establish the forest's resilience to increasing environmental variability; reduce wildfire risk and protect the area watersheds that support local communities as well as tribal communities.

Applicable Geographic Region:
Montezuma County

TCP - SCREENING

Forest Health & Resiliency- Buffer Zone to FS - RANKING

Forest Health and
Wildfire Mitigation

This project is a continuation of a proposal that was granted in 2016 and 2018 to address excessive biomass accumulation that has increase the wildfire hazard on the eastern side of La Plata County.

Applicable Geographic Region:
La Plata County

TCP - SCREENING

Forest Health and Wildfire Mitigation - RANKING

Guadalupe
Sanchez Ditch

Increase irrigation efficiency and decrease water loss.  The integrity of the ditch and the quality of the water will also increase due to the decrease in erosion.

Applicable Geographic Region:
Costilla County

TCP - SCREENING

Guadalupe Sanchez Ditch - RANKING

Hayden Pass

This project will result in functional irrigation systems, stabilized stream channels, stored floodplain connectivity and improved fish and wildlife habitat.

Applicable Geographic Region:
Fremont County

TCP - SCREENING

Hayden Pass - RANKING

Haxtun CD Soil Health

This project aims to install conservation practices and systems that help increase soil carbon as well as  improve water efficiencies on irrigated acres. They may also lead to less weed pressure and increase livestock forage and utilization, residue cover and improve the biology in the soil.

Applicable Geographic Region:
Sedgwick County

TCP - SCREENING

Haxtun CD Soil Health - RANKING

Healthy Forest Initiative -
Cherokee Park Project

This project will create openings in the forest that will reduce crown fire potential and promote shade intolerant aspen and ponderosa pine as well as a grass-forb-shrub community will will add species diversity and result in wildlife habitat diversity.

Applicable Geographic Region:
Larimer County

TCP - SCREENING

Healthy Forest Initiative - Cherokee Park Project - RANKING

Healthy Forest Initiative -
Greater
Woodland Park 

Project will focus on improving forest health and resiliency by applying forest restoration treatments to create a network of forest openings, reduce stems per acre and promote a balance of age and size class to improve diversity.

Applicable Geographic Region:
Teller County

TCP - SCREENING

Healthy Forest Initiative - Greater Woodland Park - RANKING

Healthy Forest Initiative - Headwaters of the
Big Thompson

This project will create openings in the forest that will reduce crown fire potential and promote shade intolerant aspen and ponderosa pine as well as a grass-forb-shrub community will will add species diversity and result in wildlife habitat diversity.

Applicable Geographic Region:
Larimer County

TCP - SCREENING

Healthy Forest Initiative - Headwaters of the Big Thompson - RANKING

Healthy Forest Initiative -
Magic Feather Collaborative Project 

This project will create openings in the forest that will reduce crown fire potential and promote shade intolerant aspen and ponderosa pine as well as a grass-forb-shrub community will will add species diversity and result in wildlife habitat diversity.

Applicable Geographic Region:
Larimer County

TCP - SCREENING

Healthy Forest Initiative - Magic Feather Collaborative Project - RANKING

High Mountain
Flood Irrigation

This project will allow for the installation of higher efficiency sprinkler systems.

Applicable Geographic Region:
Grand County

TCP - SCREENING

High Mountain ​Flood Irrigation - RANKING

Irrigation
Delivery System Improvements
in Gar-Pit Area
This project will result in:
  1. Improved control and measurement of irrigation water leading to more efficient use of water. 
  2. An increase in water quality and quantity through more efficient diversion structures and more efficient irrigation delivery systems.
  3. Improves wildlife habitat including both terrestrial and aquatic, with improved riparian area and less in-stream disturbances, less sediments and salts delivered into receiving waters, improve habitat for fish and other wildlife.

Applicable Geographic Region:
Garfield County

TCP - SCREENING

Irrigation Delivery System Improvements in Mount_Sopris_Bookcliffs_and_South_Side_CDs - RANKING

Jefferson Forestry and Weed Project

This project will create openings in the forest that will reduce crown fire potential and promote shade intolerant aspen and ponderosa pine as well as a grass-forb-shrub community will will add species diversity and result in wildlife habitat diversity.

Applicable Geographic Region:
Jefferson County

TCP - SCREENING

Jefferson Forestry and Weed Project - RANKING

Jefferson Water Conservation Project

This project will reduce water needs in Jefferson County, increase crop productions and improve soil health utilizing multi species cover crops, using a crop rotations and improved use of nutrients and organic matter.

Applicable Geographic Region:
Jefferson County

TCP - SCREENING

Jefferson Water Conservation Project - RANKING

Martinez and Florida Ditch Diversions

Increase irrigation efficiency and decrease water loss.  The integrity of the ditch and the quality of the water will also increase due to the decrease in erosion.

Applicable Geographic Region:
Conejos County

TCP - SCREENING

Martinez and Florida Ditch Diversions - RANKING

New Cenicero
Ditch Co Project

Increase irrigation efficiency and decrease water loss.  The integrity of the ditch and the quality of the water will also increase due to the decrease in erosion.

Applicable Geographic Region:
Conejos County

 

TCP - SCREENING

New Cenicero ​Ditch Co Project - RANKING

Sangre de Cristo Forest Health Project II

This project will stimulate forest management planning and activing.  The funding will expand forest thinning efforts and encourage participants to become active in forest stewardship.  Small diameter and dead or dying trees, ladder fuels will be removed and excess forest floor debris will be chipped and removed.  This will also improve wildlife forage and habitat.  There will be a decrease in the competition for available water and an increase in the vigor and resilience of the remaining trees.

Applicable Geographic Region:
Custer County

Sangre de Cristo Forest Health Project II - SCREENING

Sangre de Cristo Forest Health Project II - RANKING

Timpas Creek

This project will allow for the installation of more efficient irrigation systems which will:

  1. 5-20% irrigation water application efficiency depending on the practice implemented;
  2. reduction of deep water percolation which will limit the pesticides, nutrients, salinity, and selenium in ground water and return flows;
  3. reduction of tail water runoff which will limit the pesticides, nutrients, salinity, and selenium in the surface water system.

Applicable Geographic Region:
Otero County

Timpas Creek - SCREENING

Timpas Creek - RANKING

Upper Gunnison
Basin's Irrigation Improvement Project

With the implementation of a variety of practices, the project will facilitate effective irrigation and increase predictability and quality of plant productivity. Installation or improvements of irrigation structures, ditch lining or piping, and improvement of current flood irrigation systems will help improve water use, soil quality, plant health and productivity, as well as, and aquatic habitat fragmentation and soil erosion. These healthier plant communities are more resistant and resilient to stressors including drought and noxious weeds—which are growing concerns of future climate change.  The project enables increased economic and ecological sustainability and the maintenance of our local agriculture and its associated values.

Applicable Geographic Region:
Gunnison County

TCP - SCREENING

Upper Gunnison ​Basin's Irrigation Improvement Project - RANKING

LOCAL RESOURCE TEAMS FUND POOLS 

Allows funding for locally identified natural resource concerns.

Applicable Geographic Region:
Statewide resource team map

LOCAL RESOURCE TEAMS FUND POOLS

Resource Team 1
Craig/Meeker

Local work-groups identified the following as priority natural resource concerns within the area: 

  1. Irrigation pasture and hayland
  2. Irrigation cropland
  3. Grazing lands
  4. Forestry
  5. Non-irrigation cropland

Applicable Geographic Region:
Resource Team 1 map and contact

 

Resource Teams - SCREENING

Irrigation pasture and hayland - RANKING

Irrigation cropland - RANKING

Grazing lands - RANKING

Forestry - RANKING

Non-irrigation cropland - RANKING

Resource Team 2
Steamboat Springs/Walden

Local-work-groups identified the following as priority natural resource concerns within the area: 

  1. Irrigation pasture and hayland
  2. Grazing lands
  3. Non-irrigation cropland

Applicable Geographic Region:
Resource Team 2 map and contact

Resource Teams - SCREENING

Irrigation pasture and hayland - RANKING

Grazing lands - RANKING

Non-irrigation cropland - RANKING

Resource Team 3
Glenwood Springs/Kremmling

Local work-groups identified the following as priority natural resource concerns within the area: 

  1. Irrigation pasture and hayland
  2. Grazing lands

Applicable Geographic Region:
Resource Team 3 map and contact

Resource Teams - SCREENING

Irrigation pasture and hayland - RANKING

Grazing lands - RANKING

Resource Team 4
Grand Junction/Delta

 

Local work-groups identified the following as priority natural resource concerns within the area: 

  1. Irrigation pasture and hayland
  2. Irrigation cropland
  3. Grazing lands
  4. Forestry
  5. Non-irrigation cropland

Applicable Geographic Region:
Resource Team 4 map and contact

Resource Teams - SCREENING

Irrigation pasture and hayland - RANKING

Irrigation cropland - RANKING

Grazing lands - RANKING

Forestry - RANKING

Resource Team 5
Montrose/Norwood

 

Local work-groups identified the following as priority natural resource concerns within the area: 

  1. Irrigation pasture and hayland
  2. Irrigation cropland
  3. Grazing lands
  4. Forestry

Applicable Geographic Region:
Resource Team 5 map and contact

Resource Teams - SCREENING

Irrigation pasture and hayland - RANKING

Irrigation cropland - RANKING

Grazing lands - RANKING

Forestry - RANKING

Resource Team 6

Local work-groups identified the following as priority natural resource concerns within the area: 

  1. Irrigation pasture and hayland
  2. Irrigation cropland
  3. Grazing lands
  4. Forestry
  5. Non-irrigation cropland

Applicable Geographic Region:
Resource Team 6 map and contact

Resource Teams - SCREENING

Irrigation pasture and hayland - RANKING

Irrigation cropland - RANKING

Grazing lands - RANKING

Forestry - RANKING

Non-irrigation cropland - RANKING

Resource Team 7
Durango/Pagosa Springs/Ignacio 

Local work-groups identified the following as priority natural resource concerns within the area: 

  1. Irrigation pasture and hayland
  2. Irrigation cropland
  3. Grazing lands
  4. Forestry
  5. Non-irrigation cropland

Applicable Geographic Region:
Resource Team 7 map and contact

Resource Teams - SCREENING

Irrigation pasture and hayland - RANKING

Irrigation cropland - RANKING

Grazing lands - RANKING

Forestry - RANKING

Non-irrigation cropland - RANKING

Resource Team 8
Center/Alamosa/San Luis

Local work-groups identified the following as priority natural resource concerns within the area: 

  1. Irrigation cropland
  2. Grazing lands
  3. Forestry

Applicable Geographic Region:
Resource Team 8 map and contact

Resource Teams - SCREENING

Irrigation cropland - RANKING

Grazing lands - RANKING

Forestry - RANKING

Resource Team 9
Canyon City/Salida/Silver Cliff

Local work-groups identified the following as priority natural resource concerns within the area: 

  1. Irrigation pasture and hayland
  2. Irrigation cropland
  3. Grazing lands
  4. Non-irrigation cropland

Applicable Geographic Region:
Resource Team 9 map and contact

Resource Teams - SCREENING

Irrigation pasture and hayland - RANKING

Irrigation cropland - RANKING

Grazing lands - RANKING

Forestry- RANKING

Resource Team 10
Walsenburg/Trinidad

Local work-groups identified the following as priority natural resource concerns within the area: 

  1. Irrigation pasture and hayland
  2. Irrigation cropland
  3. Grazing lands
  4. Forestry

Applicable Geographic Region:
Resource Team 10 map and contact

Resource Teams - SCREENING

Irrigation pasture and hayland - RANKING

Irrigation cropland - RANKING

Grazing lands - RANKING

Forestry - RANKING

Resource Team 11
Lamar/Las Animas/Holly/Springfield

Local work-groups identified the following as priority natural resource concerns within the area: 

  1. Irrigation cropland
  2. Grazing lands
  3. Non-irrigation cropland

Applicable Geographic Region:
Resource Team 11 map and contact

Resource Teams - SCREENING

Irrigation cropland - RANKING

Grazing lands - RANKING

Non-irrigation cropland - RANKING

Resource Team 12
Pueblo/Rocky Ford

Local work-groups identified the following as priority natural resource concerns within the area: 

  1. Irrigation cropland
  2. Grazing lands
  3. Forestry
  4. Non-irrigation cropland

Applicable Geographic Region:
Resource Team 12 map and contact

Resource Teams - SCREENING

Irrigation cropland - RANKING

Grazing lands - RANKING

Forestry - RANKING

Non-irrigation cropland - RANKING

Resource Team 13
Cheyenne Wells/Eads

Local work-groups identified the following as priority natural resource concerns within the area: 

  1. Grazing lands
  2. Non-irrigation cropland

Applicable Geographic Region:
Resource Team 13 map and contact

Resource Teams - SCREENING

Grazing lands - RANKING

Non-irrigation cropland - RANKING

Resource Team 14
Burlington/Flagler/Hugo

Local work-groups identified the following as priority natural resource concerns within the area: 

  1. Irrigation cropland
  2. Grazing lands
  3. Non-irrigation cropland

Applicable Geographic Region:
Resource Team 14 map and contact

Resource Teams - SCREENING

Irrigation cropland - RANKING

Grazing lands - RANKING

Non-irrigation cropland - RANKING

Resource Team 15
Colorado Springs/Franktown/Simla

Local work-groups identified the following as priority natural resource concerns within the area: 

  1. Irrigation pasture and hayland
  2. Irrigation cropland
  3. Grazing lands
  4. Forestry
  5. Non-irrigation cropland

Applicable Geographic Region:
Resource Team 15 map and contact

Resource Teams - SCREENING

Irrigation pasture and hayland - RANKING

Irrigation cropland - RANKING

Grazing lands - RANKING

Forestry - RANKING

Non-irrigation cropland - RANKING

Resource Team 16
Longmont/Denver

Local work-groups identified the following as priority natural resource concerns within the area: 

  1. Irrigation cropland
  2. Grazing lands
  3. Non-irrigation cropland

Applicable Geographic Region:
Resource Team 16 map and contact

 

Resource Teams - SCREENING

Forestry - RANKING

Irrigation cropland - RANKING

Irrigation Pasture and Hay land - RANKING

Non-irrigation cropland - RANKING

Resource Team 17
Brighton/Byers

Local work-groups identified the following as priority natural resource concerns within the area: 

  1. Irrigation cropland
  2. Grazing lands
  3. Non-irrigation cropland

Applicable Geographic Region:
Resource Team 17 map and contact

Resource Teams - SCREENING

Irrigation cropland - RANKING

Grazing lands - RANKING

Non-irrigation cropland - RANKING

Resource Team 18
Akron/Wray/Yuma

Local work-groups identified the following as priority natural resource concerns within the area: 

  1. Irrigation cropland
  2. Grazing lands
  3. Non-irrigation cropland

Applicable Geographic Region:
Resource Team 18 map and contact

Resource Teams - SCREENING

Irrigation cropland - RANKING

Grazing lands - RANKING

Non-irrigation cropland - RANKING

Resource Team 19
Julesburg/Holyoke

Local work-groups identified the following as priority natural resource concerns within the area: 

  1. Irrigation cropland
  2. Grazing lands
  3. Non-irrigation cropland

Applicable Geographic Region:
Resource Team 19 map and contact

Resource Teams - SCREENING

Irrigation cropland - RANKING

Grazing lands - RANKING

Non-irrigation cropland - RANKING

Resource Team 20
Sterling/Fort Morgan

Local work-groups identified the following as priority natural resource concerns within the area: 

  1. Irrigation cropland
  2. Grazing lands
  3. Non-irrigation cropland

Applicable Geographic Region:
Resource Team 20 map and contact

Resource Teams - SCREENING

Irrigation cropland - RANKING

Grazing lands - RANKING

Non-irrigation cropland - RANKING

Resource Team 21
Fort Collins/Greeley

Local work-groups identified the following as priority natural resource concerns within the area: 

  1. Irrigation cropland
  2. Grazing lands
  3. Forestry
  4. Non-irrigation cropland

Applicable Geographic Region:
Resource Team 21 map and contact

 

Resource Teams - SCREENING

Irrigation cropland - RANKING

Grazing lands - RANKING

Forestry - RANKING

Non-irrigation cropland - RANKING

 

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Eligible Practices and Payment Rates 

The list of eligible practices and rates are provided in the 2019 Payment Schedule. The Payment Schedule identifies practice payment limits that may apply and conditions where the practices may apply.  Contact your local service center for assistance in determining which payment rate would apply to individual projects.

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