Skip Navigation

APPENDIX II - MANURE CHARACTERISTICS

The tables presented in this section detail the manure characteristics for selected livestock and poultry categories tracked for this analysis. A greater discussion of the development of manure characteristics from existing data bases is presented in "Documentation for Manure Characteristics," by David Moffitt, November 1996. The general outline of this 1996 document has been used here to provide continuity.

The categories of livestock initially identified to be tracked are as follows:

Beef and Dairy

Mature beef cows

Mature dairy cows

Heifers and

heifer calves

Cattle and calves (steers, steer calves, bulls and bull calves)

Hogs and Pigs

Hogs used for breeding

Other hogs and pigs

Poultry

Chickens three months and older

Broiler and other meat type chickens

Turkeys

Available data bases do not lend themselves directly to these categories. In preparing the tables that follow, it was assumed "hogs used for breeding" was composed of gestating and lactating sows as well as boars. "Other hogs and pigs" were assumed to be "grower" pigs listed in the typical data bases. "Chickens three months and older" were assumed to be layers knowing the group could be either layers or breeders. There does appear to be some difference between layer and breeder manure, possibly due to the roosters housed with the breeder hens. The difference did not appear to be significant enough to divide "chickens three months and older" into two categories. "Broiler and other meat type chickens" were assumed to be broilers.

"Sheep and goats" and "horses and ponies" were not included in this analysis. Although these livestock types often are confined, relatively small amounts of the manure they produce can be recovered and managed as a resource. It should not be assumed that this is always the case, however, or that these animal categories are never associated with environmental degradation.

Data base Selection

Several states were contacted to determine the source of manure data used in their planning and design. Of those contacted, none had locally developed numbers (where the actual samples and analyses were limited to the locality of the preparer). Several referenced data recommended by state universities, but these proved to be local adaptations of nationally available information. One of the major data sources being used was that of the Midwest Plan Service (MWPS), which by name has the appearance of regionalized data. In fact the published data from MWPS has been condensed from data published by the American Society of Agricultural Engineers (ASAE). With the uncertainty of the proper procedures for weighting local data bases and with limited time available to prepare the material, nationally available manure characteristics and regional estimates of recoverable manure were used.

The four data bases selected for further consideration were from the MWPS, NRCS, ASAE and North Carolina State University (NC State). In citation form the four data sources are as follows:

  1. Midwest Plan Service - 18; "Livestock Waste Facilities Handbook;" Table 2-1 (1985)
  2. USDA-NRCS, "Agricultural Waste Management Field Handbook;" Chapter 4 (1992)
  3. North Carolina State University, "Livestock Manure Characterization Values From the North Carolina Database;" Selected tables (1990)
  4. ASAE D384.1, "Manure production and characteristics," (1993)

In examining a tabular display of all four data bases, the values were remarkably similar in most cases. In one or two cases where these data were not similar, other information, such as the weights of the animals in the sampled group, explained the differences. It is likely that the NRCS, NC State, and ASAE data bases have some common data points, making it appropriate to average the values for all the data available. The ASAE data were removed before averaging for each group to prevent double counting of the ASAE information that is reflected in the MWPS presentation. In addition, some of the values listed in the three data sets appeared to be out of the range of similar data in the other sources. Where corresponding values for the questionable data existed other reports, these values were left intact. Where corresponding values did not exist elsewhere, the data were removed as noted in Tables A-3 through A-6 with the designation of an "a." Since the ASAE values have the opportunity to be the most current and dynamic, the mean of the resulting values in the four tables were compared with the ASAE data. In all cases the results of the comparison were acceptable.

Tables A-3 through A-6 display the tabulated manure production and nutrient content values as used in the analysis. The units are in pounds per 1,000 pound animal unit per day, which is the common reporting unit in all the data bases. Table A-7 is the same data converted to the units shown, and corresponds to the manure production and "as excreted" values in Table A-8, as will be discussed below.

One of the considerations in preparing these tables is agreeing to the appropriateness of "average" weight for a livestock or poultry. Where the animal is taken essentially from birth to market in the same operation, a simple average between birth weight and market weight seems appropriate and was used in this analysis for categories such as broiler and turkey. For other animal groups the decision was not as easy. One source of information to aid in the average weight discussion was, "Livestock and Poultry Waste Management - A National Overview," by Dr. John Sweeten of Texas A&M University (1992).

Another source of information on average weights was the NC State data base already discussed. One of the items listed in support of the manure characteristics was the average weight of the animal contributing to the data base. The final data source was the 1994 set of factors developed for the "Status and Trends" report of the NRCS RCA effort. The 1994 NRCS values were determined primarily by assuming average weights from birth to market for most animal categories with allowances for mature animals for breeding, laying, milking, etc. The resulting values were discussed with industry spokespersons where available.

For these tables, the 1994 NRCS data was the starting point for determining average weights. Where the NC State data could help, such as dividing hogs and pigs between growers and breeders, average weights by sub category were established. Dr. Sweeten's work was used as a check for the categories as a whole.

The nutrient values in the MWPS data and the NC State data were reported in their combined form rather than their elemental form. The combined or molecular weights were converted to elemental nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium before they were tabulated. In the case of nitrogen, the reported value was total Kjeldahl nitrogen or TKN. By definition TKN does not account for nitrogen in the nitrate-nitrite form, but since the data is for fresh manure, and very little nitrate would be expected, the value of TKN was used as total nitrogen.

The length of the production year was set at 365 days for all livestock categories, which tends to over estimate manure production on an annual basis for livestock groups, such as broilers, that have multiple growth cycles per year. The "down" time between production cycles varies depending on market pressures and the availability of birds to restock. It is normally a matter of days, but can be a week or more. The individual producer in modern animal production normally has little input into the down time.

To convert the "as excreted" manure production from Table A-3 to that in Table A-7, the value of pounds of manure per 1,000 pound animal unit per day is multiplied by 365 days per year and divided by 2,000 pounds per ton. To convert the nutrient values from Tables A-4 through A-6 to that in Table A-7, the average value in Tables A-4 through A-6 in pounds per 1,000 pound animal unit per day were multiplied by 365 days per year and divided by the number of tons per animal unit just calculated to arrive at pounds of nutrients per ton of manure. These values correspond to nutrient content (as excreted) values in Table A-8.

Table A-7 converts the average values of manure characteristics from Tables A-3 through A-6 into a format conducive to use in a spread sheet with animal numbers from the Agricultural Census or other sources. The animal numbers from the Agricultural Census should be divided by the values in the column " No. of animals per AU" to arrive at the number of animal units. This value is multiplied by the information in the "Tons manure per AU" category to arrive at manure quantity. The pounds of each of the nutrients can be determined by multiplying the appropriate value from "Pounds nutrients per ton manure" times the tons of manure.

The following unnumbered table shows the animal categories in Table A-7 and their corresponding categories in Table A-8

TABLE A-7 TABLE A-8
Dairy-Milk Cow Milk Cow
Dairy-Heifers Heifers and Heifer Calves
Beef-Steer-Bulls-Calves Steers, Calves, Bulls, and Bull Calves
Beef-Cows Beef Cows
Hogs and Pigs-Grower Other Hog and Pig Inventory
Hogs and Pigs-Breeder Breeding Hogs and Pig Inventory
Poultry-Broilers Broiler Inventory
Poultry-Layers Hens and Pullets of Laying Age Inventory
Poultry-Turkeys Turkeys for Slaughter Inventory

For the purposes of this analysis, manure production and manure nutrient content factors were required for categories of animals for which direct values were not visible from the four data sets used to calculated the manure production and manure nutrient content factors used for this analysis. Thus, certain assumptions were made in order to account for the additional animal categories listed in Table A-8 and at the beginning of the documentation, but were not identified in Table A-7. These categories are: Number of fattened cattle sold; Pullets over three months, but not laying inventory; Pullets under three months inventory; and Turkey hens for breeding inventory.

The manure characteristics used for the category "Number of fattened cattle sold" were the same as those used for the category of "Steers, calves, bulls and bull calves." From definitions and information provided in the databases, it is not obvious where to draw the line between "steer" and "fattened cattle," except possibly by weight with the fattened cattle category at the high end of the steer category. The data bases did show some differences in the weight of manure produced between steers and fattened cattle, but the nutrient content in terms of pounds per 1,000 pound animal units was essentially identical. Since arriving at total nutrients is the logical outcome of this activity, the decision was made to use the same manure characteristics used for the category of "Number of fattened cattle sold" as used for the category of "Steers, calves, bulls and bull calves."

There was not a great deal of information on pullets in any of the data bases used. The NRCS AWMFH Table 4-14 was the only data base that even listed the category. The dictionary definition of a pullet is a young hen. In the common vernacular of the industry, a pullet is a replacement layer, either to be used to lay eggs for the egg market or to lay eggs for broilers. Generally the pullet is fed a maintenance diet, which is reflected in the manure characteristics. For the purposes of these characteristics, the pullet older than three months can be assumed to have the average weight of the layer; the pullet less than three months, the average weight of the broiler.

The category of turkey hens for breeding was included in the NC State data and will be used here directly. The following unnumbered table lists manure characteristics as excreted for the categories of pullet and for the category of turkey hens for breeding.

Manure Characteristics Pullets Turkeys
  No. / 1,000 No. AU/ day
Manure Production 45.6 50
Nitrogen as N 0.62 0.56
Phosphorus as P 0.24 0.76 1
Potassium as K 0.26 0.23 2

1 Listed as P2O5; multiply by 0.437 to convert to P 2 Listed as K2O; multiply by 0.83 to convert to K

The categories of nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium content (after losses) in Table A-8 were added to provide a mechanism for estimating the amount of nutrients that would be present in land applied manure and effluent. There is no "national" or even regional perspective on what these values should be. The estimates shown are based on a three part assumption:

  • Nitrogen -N losses will exceed (greatly exceed) those of phosphorus -P and potassium -K primarily due to volatilization of nitrogen compounds.
  • As the quality (from an automation view) and numbers of manure management systems improve, the losses of nutrients, particularly nitrogen, may increase. In other words, as the manure management system becomes more automated, nitrogen losses through volatilization also increase.
  • Phosphorus and potassium amounts are present within the bottom sludge of lagoons and ponds, and even though the sludge is not removed on a regular basis, the P and K content must be considered in an application strategy; i.e., effluent composition may not reflect actual N, P, and K in the lagoon or holding pond.

Numerous individuals in USDA, at universities, and part of the industry groups were consulted to arrive at the "national" values for after losses. The discussions focused on the types of manure systems typically used by the industry in different parts of the country, the losses typically associated with these systems (see Chapter 11, AWMFH), and the portion of the nation's livestock raised in different parts of the country. The values shown in Table A-8 are estimates based on all these assumptions and considerations.

The category of "Production Cycles Per Year" was added to Table A-8 after the table was originally prepared. The information is useful where census data lists annual production rather than "snapshot" type information, and the number of animals from the census must be adjusted to reflect the number of animals using a facility at any one time (see discussion about 365 day year). Many of the animal categories have life cycles that extend beyond one year, and the "Production Cycles Per Year" is simply listed as one.

The "Production Cycles Per Year" for fattened cattle is listed as 2.5. The industry indicates the normal time in a confined setting ranges from as low as 60 to 200 days, depending on season, costs of feed, and the market situation. Normal time in confinement is estimated at 120 to 180 days. The availability of cattle to restock confinement facilities also varies because of the same three factors, and can greatly affect the number of days the confinement facility is used in any year's time. By using a middle value for "Production Cycles Per Year," and maintaining a 365 day production year, resulting nutrient calculations should be within an acceptable range.

The "Production Cycles Per Year" for "Other Hogs and Pigs" is listed as 2 based on John Sweeten's work. The values for "Production Cycles Per Year" for all poultry were taken directly from Table 3, "Poultry Waste Management and Environmental Protection Manual," Alabama Cooperative Extension Service, Auburn University, Circular ANR-580.

Recoverable Manure

To calculate the quantities of nutrients available from animal manure, it was necessary to estimate the quantities of recoverable manure for each of the animal categories studied.

The estimates of recoverable manure used for this study are listed in Tables A-9 and A-10. These estimates were prepared using information originally published by Donald L. Van Dyne and Conrad B. Gilbertson in 1978 in their report "Estimating U.S. Livestock and Poultry Manure and Nutrient Production;" from responses the states (NRCS State Agronomists and State Engineers) provided to a July 8, 1994 NRCS questionnaire that updated Van Dyne and Gilbertson's data; answers to phone questions about management systems; and animal numbers from Tables 6-15 through 6-26 in Appendix II of RCA Working Paper #14, Nutrient Use in Cropland Agriculture - Commercial Fertilizer and Manure, February 1996.

In application, the "recoverable manure" factors are multiplied times the "tons of manure per animal unit" or by the "total tons of manure produced by the entire population of an animal category" to arrive at the value of recoverable manure. Nutrient values per ton remain the same based on the assumption that the decrease in nutrients "as excreted" to "recoverable" mirror the reduction in the solids content of the recoverable manure. This assumption is environmentally conservative and, for phosphorus and potassium, is relatively sound. For nitrogen, however, the assumption has some problems. Nitrogen, being relatively volatile in some forms, has a tendency to decrease rapidly as the manure is left unrecovered. Unfortunately, there is relatively little information to relate recoverable manure and recoverable nitrogen. It could vary both by animal type and management style. The best estimate of manure nutrient content for land application comes from considering both "recoverable manure" and "after losses" together, i.e., neither taken separately tells the complete story.

Assigning the proper recoverable factors to livestock in categories K806 (Heifers and Heifer Calves) and K807 (Steers, Calves, Bulls, and Bull Calves) was a complicated process. The recoverable factors listed in Table A-9 for these two census categories of livestock could not always be applied directly in the analysis. For some of the livestock sub-categories developed for this analysis, the recoverable factors for category K804 (Beef Cows) were used. Pages A-29 through A-34 of this Appendix describe the rules developed to address Cattle, and identify recoverable factors used.

Table A-3: Database Summary of Livestock Manure Characteristics-Quantity of Manure
Animal Type Quantity of Manure
LB/1,000 No. AU/day
  Source 1 Source 2 Source 3 Average
Dairy  
1,350 LB cow 82 80 88.6 83.53333
Heifers - a 66 66
Beef  
Steer - Bulls - Calves 60 55 59 58
Cows 63 63 a 63
Hogs and Pigs  
"Grower" 65 a 96 80.5
"Breeder" 32 a 35 33.5
"Sows and litters" 88 - - 88
Poultry  
Broilers a 80 84 82
Layers a 60.5 65 62.75
Turkeys a 43.6 46 44.8
  1. Midwest Plan Service - 18; "Livestock Waste Facilities Handbook;" Table 2-1 (1985)
  2. USDA-NRCS, "Agricultural Waste Management Field Handbook;" Chapter 4 (1992)
  3. North Carolina State University, "Livestock Manure Characterization Values From the North Carolina Database;" Selected Tables (1990)
  4. Data available, but values given do not correspond to that in other databases, and differences in values cannot be reconciled.
Table A-4: Database Summary of Livestock Manure Characteristics-Nitrogen
Animal Type Nitrogen
LB/1,000 No. AU/day
  Source 1 Source 2 Source 3 Average
Dairy  
1350 LB cow 0.41 0.45 0.48 0.446667
Heifers - A 0.2 0.2
Beef  
Steer - Bulls - Calves 0.3 0.305 0.35 0.318333
Cows 0.36 0.33 a 0.345
Hogs and Pigs  
"Grower" 0.45 a 0.46 0.455
"Breeder" 0.214 a 0.23 0.222
"Sows and litters" 0.61 - - 0.61
Poultry  
Broilers a 1.1 1.1 1.1
Layers a 0.83 0.86 0.845
Turkeys - 0.74 0.62 0.68
  1. Midwest Plan Service - 18; "Livestock Waste Facilities Handbook;" Table 2-1 (1985)
  2. USDA-NRCS, "Agricultural Waste Management Field Handbook;" Chapter 4 (1992)
  3. North Carolina State University, "Livestock Manure Characterization Values From the North Carolina Database;" Selected Tables (1990
  4. Data available, but values given do not correspond to that in other databases, and differences in values cannot be reconciled
Table A-5: Database Summary of Livestock Manure Characteristics-Phosphorus
Animal Type Phosphorus
LB/1,000 No. AU/day
  Source 1 Source 2 Source 3 Average
Dairy  
1350 LB cow 0.072 0.07 0.099 0.080333
Heifers - A 0.043 0.043
Beef  
Steer - Bulls - Calves 0.096 0.102 0.095 0.097667
Cows 0.119 0.12 a 0.1195
Hogs and Pigs  
"Grower" 0.145 a 0.12 0.1325
"Breeder" 0.073 a 0.066 0.0695
"Sows and litters" 0.202 - - 0.202
Poultry  
Broilers a 0.34 0.3 0.32
Layers a 0.31 0.315 0.3125
Turkeys - 0.28 0.25 0.265
  1. Midwest Plan Service - 18; "Livestock Waste Facilities Handbook;" Table 2-1 (1985)
  2. USDA-NRCS, "Agricultural Waste Management Field Handbook;" Chapter 4 (1992)
  3. North Carolina State University, "Livestock Manure Characterization Values From the North Carolina Database;" Selected Tables (1990)
  4. Data available, but values given do not correspond to that in other databases, and differences in values cannot be reconciled
Table A-6: Database Summary of Livestock Manure Characteristics-Potassium
Animal Type Potassium
LB/1,000 No. AU/day
  Source 1 Source 2 Source 3 Average
Dairy  
1350 LB cow 0.27 0.26 0.31 0.28
Heifers - a 0.166 0.166
Beef  
Steer - Bulls - Calves 0.24 0.225 0.22 0.228333
Cows 0.26 0.26 a 0.26
Hogs and Pigs  
"Grower" 0.3 a 0.34 0.32
"Breeder" 0.125 a 0.13 0.1275
"Sows and litters" 0.4 - - 0.4
Poultry  
Broilers a 0.46 0.4 0.43
Layers a 0.34 0.315 0.3275
Turkeys - 0.28 0.24 0.26
  1. Midwest Plan Service - 18; "Livestock Waste Facilities Handbook;" Table 2-1 (1985)
  2. USDA-NRCS, "Agricultural Waste Management Field Handbook;" Chapter 4 (1992)
  3. North Carolina State University, "Livestock Manure Characterization Values From the North Carolina Database;" Selected Tables (1990)
  4. Data available, but values given do not correspond to that in other databases, and differences in values cannot be reconciled
Table A-7: Manure Nutrient Factors (Wet Basis) to Use with the 1992 Agricultural Census
Animal Type Average Weight (pounds) Number of Animals per AU Tons Manure per AU Pounds of Nutrients per Ton Manure
  Nitrogen Phosphorus Potassium
Dairy  
Milk cow 1350 0.74 15.24 10.69 1.92 6.70
Heifers 550 1.82 12.05 6.06 1.30 5.03
Beef  
Steer - Bulls - Calves 650 1.54 10.59 10.98 3.37 7.87
Cows 1,000 1.00 11.50 10.95 3.79 8.25
Hogs and Pigs  
"Grower" 110 9.09 14.69 11.30 3.29 7.95
"Breeder" 375 2.67 6.11 13.26 4.28 7.85
"Sows and litters"  
Poultry  
Broilers 2.2 454.55 14.97 26.83 7.80 10.49
Layers 4 250.00 11.45 26.93 9.96 10.44
Turkeys 15 66.67 8.18 30.36 11.83 11.61

NOTE: Table A-7 values convert data from Tables A-3 through A-6 into a format conducive to use with animal numbers from the agricultural census database. Values listed are on a wet manure basis.

Table A-8: Manure Production and Manure Nutrient Content Factors to Use with the 1992 Census of Agriculture
  Census Variable Symbol Animals per Animal Unit (AU) Manure Production Factors (Tons per AU) Manure Nutrient Content Factors
(Pounds/Ton)
Production Cycles (Number per Year)
  - Nitrogen - - Phosphorus - - Potassium -
as excreted after losses as excreted after losses as excreted after losses
Beef Cows K804 1.00 11.50 10.95 3.30 3.79 3.23 8.25 7.44 1
Milk Cows K805 0.74 15.24 10.69 4.30 1.92 1.65 6.7 6.04 1
Heifers & Heifer Calves K806 1.82 12.05 6.06 1.82 1.30 1.10 5.03 4.53 1
Steers, Calves, Bulls, & Bull Calves K807 1.64 10.59 10.98 3.30 3.37 2.86 7.87 7.08 1
Number of Fattened Cattle Sold K812 1.14 10.59 10.98 4.39 3.37 2.86 7.87 7.08 2.5
Breeding Hog & Pig Inventory K816 2.67 6.11 13.26 3.32 4.28 3.62 7.85 7.04 1
Other Hog & Pig Inventory K817 9.09 14.69 11.30 2.82 3.29 2.80 7.95 7.16 2
Hens & Pullets of Laying Age Inventory K892 250.00 11.45 26.93 18.46 9.98 8.50 10.44 9.4 1
Pullets over 3 Mo., but not Laying Inventory K894 250.00 8.32 27.20 13.60 10.53 8.95 11.41 10.27 2
Pullets under 3 Mo. Inventory K896 455.00 8.32 27.20 13.60 10.53 8.95 11.41 10.27 2
Broiler Inventory K898 455.00 14.97 26.83 16.10 7.80 6.61 10.49 9.48 6
Turkeys for Slaughter Inventory K900 67.00 8.18 30.36 16.18 11.83 10.06 11.61 10.44 2
Turkey Hens for Breeding Inventory K902 50.00 9.12 22.41 11.20 13.21 11.23 7.60 6.84 1

 

Table A-9:Recoverable Manure Calculation Factors for Cattle and Swine
Region / State Animal Categories
  Beef Cows (grazing) Beef Cows (fattened) Milk Cows Heifers & Heifer Calves Steers, Calves, Bulls, & Bull Calves Breeding Hogs & Pigs Other Hogs & Pigs
(K804) (K812) (K805) (K806) (K807) (K816) (K817)
EAST:  
  Connecticut 0.10 0.85 0.90 0.90 0.85 0.80 0.80
Delaware 0.10 0.85 0.80 0.70 0.85 0.80 0.80
Maine 0.10 0.85 0.80 0.70 0.85 0.80 0.80
Maryland 0.10 0.85 0.80 0.70 0.85 0.80 0.80
Massachusetts 0.10 0.85 0.80 0.70 0.85 0.80 0.80
New Hampshire 0.10 0.85 0.80 0.70 0.85 0.80 0.80
New Jersey 0.10 0.85 0.80 0.70 0.85 0.80 0.80
New York 0.10 0.85 0.80 0.70 0.85 0.80 0.80
Pennsylvania 0.05 0.85 0.80 0.65 0.85 0.80 0.80
Rhode Island 0.10 0.85 0.80 0.70 0.85 0.80 0.80
Vermont 0.20 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.85 0.80 0.80
West Virginia 0.00 1.00 0.80 0.70 0.85 0.75 0.75
MIDWEST:  
  Illinois 0.10 0.60 0.80 0.60 0.60 0.70 0.70
Indiana 0.10 0.75 0.60 0.50 0.75 0.80 0.80
Iowa 0.10 0.63 0.87 0.62 0.63 0.80 0.80
Michigan 0.083 0.75 0.90 0.80 0.75 0.664 0.664
Minnesota 0.15 0.90 0.90 0.80 0.90 0.85 0.85
Missouri 0.10 0.60 0.65 0.65 0.60 0.65 0.65
Ohio 0.10 0.70 0.90 0.75 0.70 0.75 0.75
Wisconsin 0.083 0.70 0.90 0.75 0.70 0.664 0.664
NORTHERN PLAINS:  
  Colorado 0.05 0.85 0.80 0.85 0.85 0.85 0.85
Kansas 0.05 0.75 0.85 0.60 0.75 0.80 0.80
Montana 0.01 0.85 0.75 0.75 0.85 0.80 0.80
Nebraska 0.083 0.90 0.80 0.90 0.90 0.664 0.664
North Dakota 0.00 0.85 0.80 0.60 0.85 0.50 0.50
South Dakota 0.10 0.75 0.80 0.60 0.75 0.70 0.70
Wyoming 0.05 0.80 0.80 0.70 0.80 0.75 0.75
SOUTH CENTRAL:  
  Arkansas 0.10 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50
Louisiana 0.00 0.80 0.50 0.10 0.80 0.80 0.80
Oklahoma 0.00 0.80 0.65 0.65 0.80 0.75 0.75
Texas 0.05 0.85 0.75 0.50 0.85 1.00 1.00
SOUTHEAST:  
  Alabama 0.00 0.70 0.40 0.05 0.70 0.75 0.75
Florida 0.00 0.00 0.50 0.20 0.00 0.40 0.40
Georgia 0.00 0.75 0.70 0.30 0.75 0.50 0.50
Kentucky 0.083 0.70 0.70 0.70 0.70 0.60 0.60
Mississippi 0.10 0.75 0.60 0.50 0.75 0.65 0.65
North Carolina 0.00 0.75 0.593 0.00 0.75 0.90 0.90
South Carolina 0.00 0.80 0.593 0.593 0.80 0.493 0.493
Tennessee 0.10 0.75 0.60 0.50 0.75 0.65 0.65
Virginia 0.10 0.85 0.60 0.70 0.85 0.80 0.80
WEST:  
  Arizona 0.05 0.85 0.80 0.75 0.85 0.85 0.85
Idaho 0.00 0.85 0.95 0.80 0.85 0.70 0.70
California 0.05 0.85 0.80 0.75 0.85 0.85 0.85
Washington 0.05 0.85 0.80 0.75 0.85 0.85 0.85
Oregon 0.05 0.85 0.60 0.60 0.85 0.85 0.85
Nevada 0.05 0.85 0.80 0.75 0.85 0.85 0.85
Utah 0.05 0.85 0.80 0.75 0.85 0.85 0.85
New Mexico 0.00 0.80 0.85 0.80 0.80 0.85 0.90

NOTE: Livestock categories used in this table are the agricultural census inventory variables. K806 and K807 values listed here could not always be applied directly in the analysis. The rules developed and recovery factors used to overcome this difficulty are described in Section III.

 

Table A-10: Recoverable Manure Calculation Factors for Poultry
Region / State Animal Categories
  Hens & Pullets Laying Age Pullets > 3 mo. old, not laying Pullets < 3 mo. old Broilers Turkeys for Slaughter Turkeys, Hens for Breeding
(K892) (K894) (K896) (K898) (K900) (K902)
EAST:  
  Connecticut 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.95 0.95 0.95
Delaware 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.95 0.95 0.95
Maine 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.95 0.95 0.95
Maryland 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.95 0.95 0.95
Massachusetts 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.95 0.95 0.95
New Hampshire 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.95 0.95
New Jersey 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.95 0.95 0.95
New York 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.95 0.95 0.95
Pennsylvania 0.95 0.95 0.95 0.95 0.95 0.95
Rhode Island 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.95 0.95 0.95
Vermont 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.95 0.95 0.95
West Virginia 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00
MIDWEST:  
  Illinois 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.95 0.95
Indiana 0.95 0.95 0.95 0.95 0.95 0.95
Iowa 0.99 0.99 0.99 0.99 0.69 0.69
Michigan 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.448 0.448
Minnesota 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.40 0.40
Missouri 0.85 0.85 0.85 0.90 0.75 0.75
Ohio 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.70 0.70
Wisconsin 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.70 0.70
NORTHERN PLAINS:  
  Colorado 0.95 0.95 0.95 0.95 0.65 0.65
Kansas 0.95 0.95 0.95 0.95 0.75 0.75
Montana 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.90 0.90
Nebraska 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.643 0.643
North Dakota 0.85 0.85 0.85 0.85 0.85 0.85
South Dakota 0.95 0.95 0.95 0.95 0.80 0.80
Wyoming 0.95 0.95 0.95 0.95 0.75 0.75
SOUTH CENTRAL:  
  Arkansas 0.80 0.80 0.80 0.95 0.70 0.70
Louisiana 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.80 0.80
Oklahoma 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.80 0.80
Texas 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.80
SOUTHEAST:  
  Alabama 0.95 0.95 0.95 0.98 0.85 0.85
Florida 0.95 0.95 0.95 0.95 0.85 0.85
Georgia 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.95 0.70 0.70
Kentucky 0.80 0.80 0.80 0.80 0.80 0.80
Mississippi 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.95 0.85 0.85
North Carolina 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.99 0.99
South Carolina 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.85 0.85
Tennessee 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.95 0.85 0.85
Virginia 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00
WEST:  
  Arizona 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.65 0.65
Idaho 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.65 0.65
California 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.20 0.20
Washington 0.80 0.80 0.80 0.80 0.65 0.65
Oregon 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.65 0.65
Nevada 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.70 0.70
Utah 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.65 0.65
New Mexico 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.65 0.65

III. FERTILIZER NUTRIENTS FROM LIVESTOCK MANURE


< back to Nutrients Available from Livestock Manure Relative to Crop Growth Requirements