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Environmental Quality Incentive Program - Conservation Incentive Contract (CIC)

Overview

The Environmental Quality Incentive Program - Conservation Incentive Contract (EQIP-CIC) is a pilot program in the state of Oregon for FY21.  EQIP-CIC combines EQIP Classic practices with the benefits of enhancements with Conservation Stewardship Program (CSP) into High Priority Areas (HPA) determined by the State Conservationist in Oregon. Landowners are encouraged to apply by July 12, 2021.

EQIP-CIC

The 2018 Farm Bill introduced EQIP incentive contracts to expand resource beneļ¬ts for producers through incentive conservation practices such as cover crops, transition to resource conserving crop rotations, and precision agriculture technologies along with a similarly broad suite of incentive practices for ranchers and nonindustrial private forest operators. EQIP incentive contracts can be a steppingstone for producers between EQIP classic and Conservation Stewardship Program contracts without enrolling the entire operation.

The conservation goals and funding priorities of the EQIP CIC High Priority Area (HPA) ranking pools are to focus on providing resource protection in affected drought areas across the State of Oregon.  

The State Conservationist has determined that geographic scope of EQIP CIC HPA’s will cover nonindustrial private Forestland, Cropland and Range/Pasture.  

EQIP-CIC High Priority Areas

High Priority Area

Region

Land Use

Resource Concerns

HPA 1 – Soil Health

 

State Wide

Cropland

  • Soil Quality Limitations
  • Wind and Water Erosion
  • Source Water Depletion

HPA 2 – Forest Management

State Wide

Forest

  • Fire Management
  • Degraded Plant Condition

HPA 3 – Range Management

State Wide

Range

  • Degraded Plant Condition
  • Livestock Production Limitations
  • Fire Management

HPA 4 – Pasture Management

State Wide

Pasture

  • Degraded Plant Condition
  • Livestock Production Limitations

HPA 5 – Drought

State Wide (minus Klamath Basin)

Cropland

  • Soil Quality Limitations
  • Wind and Water Erosion
  • Source Water Depletion

HPA 6 – Drought

State Wide (minus Klamath Basin)

Forest

  • Fire Management
  • Degraded Plant Condition

HPA 7 – Drought

State Wide (minus Klamath Basin)

Range

  • Degraded Plant Condition
  • Livestock Production Limitations
  • Fire Management

HPA 8 – Drought

State Wide (minus Klamath Basin)

Pasture

  • Degraded Plant Condition
  • Livestock Production Limitations

HPA 9 – Klamath Basin

Klamath Basin

Cropland

  • Soil Quality Limitations
  • Wind and Water Erosion

HPA 10 – Klamath Basin

Klamath Basin

Forest

  • Fire Management
  • Degraded Plant Condition

HPA 11 – Klamath Basin

Klamath Basin

Range

  • Degraded Plant Condition
  • Livestock Production Limitations
  • Fire Management

HPA 12 – Klamath Basin

Klamath Basin

Pasture

  • Degraded Plant Condition
  • Livestock Production Limitations

Land Uses

The descriptions below are the general NRCS land use definitions - applications should fit within, but do not need to exactly match, these descriptions. Below are the applicable land uses for the ranking pool:

  • Crop: Land used primarily for the production and harvest of annual or perennial field, forage, food, fiber, horticultural, orchard, vineyard, or energy crops.
  • Forest: Land on which the primary vegetation is tree cover (climax, natural or introduced plant community) and use is primarily for production of wood products or non-timber forest products.
  • Range: Land used primarily for the production of grazing animals. Includes native plant communities and those seeded to native or introduced species or naturalized by introduced species that are ecologically managed using range management principles.
  • Grazed: Where grazing animals impact how land is managed.
  • Wildlife: Where the applicant is actively managing for wildlife
  • Associated Agricultural Lands: Land associated with farms and ranches that are not purposefully managed for food, forage, or fiber and are typically associated with nearby production or conservation lands. This could include incidental areas, such as odd areas, ditches and watercourses, riparian areas, field edges, seasonal and permanent wetlands, and other similar areas.

Conservation Practices & Enhancements

Below is a comprehensive list of all NRCS practices and enhancements (subject to national headquarters approval) that are eligible for financial assistance through these ranking pools; eligible practices and enhancements vary across HPAs.

Contact your local NRCS representative for further information on what is available in your area. To learn more about NRCS conservation practices, click here.

Practices

  • Forest Management Plan (106)
  • Soil Testing (216)
  • Brush Management (314)
  • Herbaceous Weed Treatment (315)
  • Conservation Cover (327)
  • Conservation Crop Rotation (328)
  • Residue and Tillage Management, No Till (329)
  • Prescribed Burning (338)
  • Cover Crop (340)
  • Critical Area Planting (342)
  • Residue and Tillage Management, Reduced Till (345)
  • Silvopasture (381)
  • Fence (382)
  • Fuel Break (383)
  • Woody Residue Treatment (384)
  • Field Border (386)
  • Firebreak (394)
  • Irrigation Pipeline (430)
  • Irrigation System, Microirrigation (441)
  • Sprinkler System (442)
  • Irrigation Water Management (449)
  • Access Control (472)
  • Mulching (484)
  • Tree/Shrub Site Preparation (490)
  • Forage Harvest Management (511)
  • Pasture and Hay Planting (512)
  • Livestock Pipeline (516)
  • Prescribed Grazing (528)
  • Pumping Plant (533)
  • Range Planting (550)
  • Roof Runoff Structure (558)
  • Heavy Use Area (561)
  • Spring Development (574)
  • Streambank and Shoreline Protection (580)
  • Structure for Water Control (587)
  • Cross Wind Ridges (588)
  • Cross Wind Trap Strips (589)
  • Nutrient Management (590)
  • Pest Management (595)
  • Herbaceous Wind Barriers (603)
  • Surface Roughening (609)
  • Tree/Shrub Establishment (612)
  • Watering Facility (614)
  • Water Harvesting Catchment (636)
  • Water Well (642)
  • Tree/Shrub Pruning (660)
  • Forest Stand Improvement (666)

Enhancements

  • Herbaceous weed treatment to create plant communities consistent with the ecological site  (E315A)
  • Resource conserving crop rotation (E328A)
  • Improved resource conserving crop rotation (E328B)
  • Conservation crop rotation on recently converted CRP grass/legume cover (E328C)
  • Soil health crop rotation (E328E)
  • Modifications to improve soil health and increase soil organic matter (E328F)
  • Crop rotation on recently converted CRP grass/legume cover for soil organic matter improvement (E328G)
  • Conservation crop rotation to reduce the concentration of salts  (E328H)
  • No till to reduce soil erosion (E329A)
  • No till system to increase soil health and soil organic matter content (E329D)
  • Controlled traffic farming to reduce compaction (E334A)
  • Strategically planned, patch burning for grazing distribution and wildlife habitat (E338A)
  • Sequential patch burning (E338C)
  • Cover crop to reduce soil erosion (E340A)
  • Intensive cover cropping to increase soil health and soil organic matter content (E340B)
  • Use of multi-species cover crops to improve soil health and increase soil organic matter (E340C)
  • Intensive orchard/vineyard floor cover cropping to increase soil health  (E340D)
  • Use of soil health assessment to assist with development of cover crop mix to improve soil health (E340E)
  • Cover crop to minimize soil compaction (E340F)
  • Using cover crops for biological strip till (E340I)
  • Reduced tillage to reduce soil erosion (E345A)
  • Reduced tillage to increase soil health and soil organic matter content  (E345D)
  • Installing electrical fence offsets and wire for cross-fencing to improve grazing management (E382B)
  • Grazing-maintained fuel breaks to reduce risk of fire (E383A)
  • Biochar production from woody residue (E384A)
  • Enhanced field borders to reduce soil erosion along the edge(s) of a field (E386A)
  • Enhanced field borders to increase carbon storage along the edge(s) of the field (E386B)
  • Advanced Automated IWM – Year 2-5, soil moisture monitoring  (E449C)
  • Advanced Automated IWM – Year 1, Equipment and soil moisture or water level monitoring (E449D)
  • Intermediate IWM— Year 1, Equipment with Soil or Water Level monitoring (E449F)
  • Intermediate IWM— Years 2 -5, using soil moisture or water level monitoring (E449H)
  • IWM - Year 1, Retrofit Equipment with Speed Control on Sprinkler Irrigation System (E449I)
  • Manage livestock access to  waterbodies to reduce nutrients or pathogens to surface water (E472A)
  • Mulching to improve soil health (E484A)
  • Forage and biomass planting to reduce soil erosion or increase organic matter to build soil health (E512B)
  • Cropland conversion to grass for soil organic matter improvement (E512C)
  • Forage plantings that help increase organic matter in depleted soils (E512D)
  • Establishing native grass or legumes in forage base to improve the plant community (E512F)
  • Native grasses or legumes in forage base  (E512G)
  • Maintaining quantity and quality of forage for animal health and productivity (E528A)
  • Improved grazing management for enhanced plant structure and composition for wildlife (E528E)
  • Stockpiling cool season forage to improve structure and composition or plant productivity and health (E528F)
  • Improved grazing management on pasture for plant productivity and health with monitoring activities  (E528G)
  • Prescribed grazing to improve/maintain riparian and watershed function-elevated water temperature (E528H)
  • Grazing management that protects sensitive areas -surface or ground water from nutrients (E528I)
  • Prescribed grazing on pastureland that improves riparian and watershed function (E528J)
  • Prescribed grazing that improves or maintains riparian and watershed function-erosion (E528L)
  • Management Intensive Rotational Grazing (E528R)
  • Advanced Pumping Plant Automation (E533A)
  • Complete pumping plant evaluation for energy savings (E533B)
  • Range planting for increasing/maintaining organic matter (E550A)
  • Range planting for improving forage, browse, or cover for wildlife (E550B)
  • Planting for high carbon sequestration rate (E612B)
  • Establishing tree/shrub species to restore native plant communities (E612C)
  • Plant food-producing trees and shrubs for wildlife or human consumption within windbreaks, alley cropping, multi-story cropping, silvopasture systems, and/or riparian forest buffers. (E612D)
  • Forest management to enhance understory vegetation (E666D)
  • Reduce forest stand density to create open stand structure (E666F)
  • Reduce forest density and manage understory along roads to limit wildfire risk and improve habitat (E666G)
  • Creating structural diversity with patch openings  (E666K)
  • Maintaining structural diversity in dry Western forests (E666M)
  • Creating structural diversity in dry Western forests (E666N)

Additional Resources

Interested Applicants

For more information about EQIP, how to apply and program eligibility, interested applicants should contact a NRCS field office in the county which you own land or where you have an agricultural operation. Landowners are encouraged to apply by July 12, 2021.