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Lost River Watershed Project NWQI

County: Klamath

Resource Concerns Addressed:

  • Concentrated erosion ‐ Bank erosion from streams, shorelines or water conveyance channels
  • Field sediment, nutrient and pathogen loss ‐ Sediment transported to surface water
  • Source water depletion ‐ Inefficient irrigation water use

Project Description

The Lost River watershed, hydrologic unit code 18010204, is located in south central Oregon, originates in California with the river flowing north into Oregon, west, then south back into California where it terminates at the Tulelake National Wildlife Refuge west of Tule Lake, California. The proposed 2012 Oregon revised 303(d) list, phosphorus is identified as a pollutant in the Lost River from just downstream of Malone diversion dam to the California/Oregon state line (RM 65.4), pH from Harpold Dam (RM 27.4) to California/Oregon state line (RM 65.4), and phosphorus for Miller Creek downstream, of Gerber reservoir (RM 0-8.8). The Lost River National Water Quality Initiative conservation is prioritized to reduce nutrients and sediments in this impaired watercourse through best management practices such as but not limited to fence, livestock watering facilities, prescribed grazing, irrigation pipeline, irrigation water management, and cover crops.  

Eligible Land Uses

Eligible land includes range, pasture and cropland

Conservation Practices Offered

  • Filter Strip (393)
  •  Irrigation Canal or Lateral (320)
  •  Pipeline (516)
  •  Residue and Tillage Management, Mulch Till (345)
  • Access Control (472)
  • Conservation Cover (327)
  • Constructed Wetland (656)
  • Cover Crop (340)
  • Critical Area Planting (342)
  • Deep Tillage (324)
  • Dike (356)
  • Fence (382)
  • Grade Stabilization Structure (410)
  • Grazing Land Mechanical Treatment (548)
  • Heavy Use Area Protection (561)
  • Herbaceous Weed Control (315)
  • Irrigation Land Leveling (464)
  • Irrigation Pipeline (430)
  • Irrigation System, Surface and Subsurface (443)
  • Irrigation Water Management (449)
  • Land Smoothing (466)
  • Mulching (484)
  • Prescribed Grazing (528)
  • Pumping Plant (533)
  • Riparian Forest Buffer (391)
  • Sediment Basin (350)
  • Structure for Water Control (587)
  • Subsurface Drain (606)
  • Surface Drain, Field Ditch (607)
  • Surface Drain, Main or Lateral (608)
  • Tree/Shrub Site Preparation (490)
  • Underground Outlet (620)
  • Water and Sediment Control Basin Water Well (642)
  • Watering Facility (614)
  • Wetland Creation (658)
  • Wetland Enhancement (659)
  • Wetland Restoration (657)

Screening Questions

High Priority Category: The application includes conservation practices that will address two or more of the following resource concerns: Elevated water temperature, Sediment transported to surface water, Nutrients transported to surface water, Sheet and rill erosion, Ephemeral gully erosion, Classic gully erosion, Bank erosion from streams, shorelines or water conveyance channels, inefficient irrigation water use. Project located within critical source area.

Medium Priority Category: The application includes conservation practices that will address at least one of the following resource concerns: Elevated water temperature, Sediment transported tosurface water, Nutrients transported to surface water, Sheet and rill erosion, Ephemeral gully erosion, Classic gully erosion, Bank erosion from streams, shorelines or water conveyance channels, inefficient irrigation water use. Project located within critical source area.

Low Priority Category: Project located within critical source area.

Ineligible Category: The EQIP application is associated with land that is not located within the boundaries of the critical source area for the National Water Quality Initiative (NWQI). The application will not address water quality degradation or soil erosion resource concerns identified in the NWQI. The application requests EQIP cost‐share funding for conversion from flood to sprinkler irrigation.

Ranking Criteria

1. Do the Planned Land Units intersect the critical source area layer for NWQI watersheds?

2. Soil Erosion: Excessive Bank Erosion (select one answer)

  • Conservation treatment will reduce bank erosion on 303d listed streams and rivers. (Examples: with fence, improved, grazing management, or other applicable practices).
  • Conservation treatment will reduce bank erosion on the North or West Canal main canal. (Examples: with fence, improved grazing management, or other applicable practices.)
  • Conservation treatment will reduce bank erosion on ancillary conveyance channels. (Examples: with fence, improved grazing management, or other applicable practices.)

3. Water Quality Degradation: Excessive Sediment in Surface Water and/or Nutrients in Surface Water  (select one answer)

  • Conservation treatment will reduce sediments/nutrients in surface water from all impacted areas in the Planned Land Unit by implementing practices that reduce sediments/nutrients in irrigation tailwater through avoidance, controlling or trapping. Appropriate practices could include but are not limited to vegetated filter strips, wetland enhancement, piping of conveyance channels.
  • Conservation treatment will reduce sediments/nutrients in surface water on 50% or more of total impacted areas in the Planned Land Unit by implementing practices that reduce sediments/nutrients in irrigation tailwater through avoidance, controlling or trapping. Appropriate practices could include but are not limited to vegetated filter strips, wetland enhancement, piping of conveyance channels.
  • Conservation treatment will reduce sediments/nutrients in surface water on less than 50% of total impacted areas in the Planned Land Unit by implementing practices that reduce sediments/nutrients in irrigation tailwater through avoidance, controlling or trapping. Appropriate practices could include but are not limited to vegetated filter strips, wetland enhancement, piping of conveyance channels.

4. Irrigation System Improvements

5. The conservation treatment will reduce soil erosion from flood irrigation delivery and application by changing open ditch flood irrigation systems to gated pipe, alfalfa riser or other piped system.

6. Water Quality Degradation: Elevated Water Temperature  (select one answer)

  • Proposed conservation treatment will reduce water temperature by planting riparian species or using other approved vegetation management practices on all riparian areas in the Planned Land Unit(s).
  • Proposed conservation treatment will reduce water temperature by planting riparian species or using other approved vegetation management practices on 50% or more of total riparian areas in the Planned Land Unit(s).
  • Proposed conservation treatment will reduce water temperature by planting riparian species or using other approved vegetation management practices on less than 50% of total riparian areas in the Planned Land Unit(s).

Partnerships

NRCS will continue to coordinate with local and state agencies, conservation districts, nongovernmental organizations and others to implement this initiative. Partners will play a crucial role in encouraging and supporting producer participation.

Contact

Josh Elke, District Conservationist
Klamath County
1945 Main Street, Ste 200
Klamath Falls, OR 97601
Phone: 541-883-6924
Email: joshua.elke@usda.gov