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News Release

USDA Opens Signup for New On-Farm Trials Effort

USDA is investing up to $25 million per year over the next five years to help support the adoption and evaluation of innovative conservation approaches on agricultural lands. USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) is accepting proposals through July 15, 2019, for On-Farm Conservation Innovation Trials (On-Farm Trials), a new, additional sub-program created by the 2018 Farm Bill for the USDA’s Conservation Innovation Grants (CIG) program. On-Farm Trials include a Soil Health Demo Trial, also created by the 2018 Farm Bill.

The On-Farm Trials funding announcement, including the 2019 funding priorities, is available here.

“Our Conservation Innovation Grants program is time-tested, highly successful and has led to tremendous discoveries and enhancements in conservation over the years,” NRCS Chief Matthew Lohr said. “The addition of On-Farm Trials and the Soil Health Demo Trial provide us with expanded opportunities to work with partners to encourage the adoption of innovative conservation approaches that, for any number of reasons, have yet to be widely adopted by agricultural producers.”

NRCS is now accepting proposals from the following eligible entities:

  • Private entities whose primary business is related to agriculture.

  • Non-governmental organizations with experience working with agricultural producers.

  • Non-Federal government agencies.

On-Farm Conservation Innovation Trials

Through On-Farm Trials, NRCS and partners will collaborate to encourage the adoption of innovative practices and systems on agricultural lands. On-Farm Trials funding goes directly to partners, which in turn provide technical assistance and incentive payments to producers to implement innovative approaches on their lands. Producers receiving On-Farm Trials payments must be eligible to participate in the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP). The maximum On-Farm Trials award for 2019 is $5 million. The minimum award is $250,000.

A critical element of each On-Farm Trials project is the project evaluation. Partners must propose robust scientific approaches to their on-farm trials, resulting in data and analyses of the environmental, financial and (to the extent possible) social impacts of the trials. For the Soil Health Demo Trial, partners must agree to use consistent soil health assessment protocols developed by NRCS.

On-Farm Trials is distinct from traditional national CIG competitive grants funding, which is used to support early pilot projects or demonstrations of promising conservation approaches and technologies and is not typically provided directly to producers. On-Farm Trials funding is designed to flow through partners directly to producers to implement innovative approaches that have been well-studied and known to provide conservation benefits.

“We are asking partners that have access to producer networks to join us in putting innovative conservation under the microscope to figure out how to expand the adoption of innovative practices and systems,” Chief Lohr said. “NRCS intends to use On-Farm Trials results to inform our own work with farmers, ranchers and forest landowners.”

More Information

On December 20, 2018, President Trump signed into law the 2018 Farm Bill, which provides support, certainty and stability to our nation’s farmers, ranchers and land stewards by enhancing farm support programs, improving crop insurance, maintaining disaster programs and promoting and supporting voluntary conservation. NRCS is committed to implementing these changes as quickly and effectively as possible, and today’s updates are part of meeting that goal.

A webinar for potential On-Farm Trials applicants is scheduled for May 29, 2019, at 3 p.m. EST. To learn more about the webinar and program, visit the CIG On-Farm Trials webpage.