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Cooperative Conservation Partnership Initiative Restores Salmon Runs to Half a Mile of Habitat

Highlights in Conservation icon

Cooperative Conservation Partnership Initiative Restores Salmon Runs to Half a Mile of Habitat

Location icon
Pacific County, City of Raymond

Project Summary icon
The project removed a fish passage barrier consisting of two undersized, perched, and collapsed culverts in a road fill with a fifty foot long bridge. The removal of the barrier provided access for aquatic organisms to half a mile of stream.

Image: Inlet of exisiting culverts.

Inlet of existing culverts.

Conservation Partners icon
Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), Pacific Conservation District (PCD), Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office (WARCO), Washington State Department of Natural Resources (WADNR), Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW).

Resource Challenges icon
Fish and wildlife, habitat fragmentation; fish and wildlife, declining species and species of concern; water quality, excessive suspended sediment and turbidity; soil erosion, road surface.

Conservation Program Used icon
Cooperative Conservation Partnership Initiative (CCPI), Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP), Family Forest Fish Passage Program (FFFPP).

Image: Outlet of Existing Culverts

Outlet of existing culverts.

Innovations and Highlights icon
WADNR Small Forest Landowners Office (SFLO) applied for CCPI funding to supplement their FFFPP on private non-industrial forest lands. FFFPP requires a sponsor to implement the program. CCPI utilizes EQIP funds for the NRCS contribution to CCPI. EQIP funds are required to be disbursed only to private landowners and cannot be distributed to public entities or agencies. The project was fully funded by FFFPP with no landowner contribution required. The difficult issue was how NRCS funds could be used with FFFPP funds to implement the project. The requirement that designs meet NRCS design standards when EQIP funds are utilized was another aspect that the design engineer for the Huber FFFPP had not encountered before. Many meetings and teleconferences were held on what the process would be to merge the two funding sources on the individual projects. It was decided that NRCS would contract the bridge installation, necessary access road improvements at the bridge site, critical area seeding, and mulching with the landowner in an EQIP contract. PCD would be the sponsor for the project. The responsibilities of the PCD were to hire an engineer to design the structure, conduct construction inspections, and develop as-built drawings for the project. The sponsor would develop bid packets and install the structure. The PCD entered into an agreement with the landowner. In that agreement the landowner was invoiced for the amount of the NRCS contract, payable to the PCD. The PCD will then reimbursed WARCO in the amount of the invoice to the landowner. Molly Dawson, NRCS West Area Engineer, worked on the NRCS engineering design requirements with the engineer hired by the PCD.

Image: New bridge looking upstream—Chris Wright, Soil Conservation Technician and Jennifer Johnston, NRCS Engineer.

New bridge looking upstream—Chris Wright, Soil Conservation Technician and Jennifer Johnston, NRCS Engineer.

Results and Accomplishments icon
The project enabled anadromous aquatic organisms access to 0.5 miles of spawning and rearing habitat. Road surface erosion adjacent to the stream was controlled and sediment delivery to surface water was significantly decreased. The landowner retained access to his forestland. The partnership for the project has provided the FFFPP the opportunity to install additional projects with current funding.

Contact icon

Scott Cook, Resource Conservationist, Montesano WA, (360) 249-5900 x101
 

NRCS, Fall 2011

 

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