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Stream and Riparian Habitat Restoration

Highlights in Conservation icon

Stream and Riparian Habitat Restoration

Knotweed after treatment. Knotweed is an invasive species that changes the vegetative make-up of the streamside from a diverse species mix of native species to a monoculture of Knotweed. In the long run this change could affect water quality, fish and aquatic habitat as well as wildlife habitat that frequent riparian areas.

Knotweed after treatment. Knotweed is an invasive species that changes the vegetative make-up of the streamside from a diverse species mix of native species to a monoculture of Knotweed. In the long run this change could affect water quality, fish and aquatic habitat as well as wildlife habitat that frequent riparian areas.

Location icon
Grays Harbor County

Project Summary icon
Elimination of Knotweed and reestablishment of native understory and overstory species.

Conservation Partners icon
Quinault Indian Nation (QIN), Salmon Recovery Fund Board, Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) and the following agencies may have a roll in the success of this project: Forest Service (USFS), Grays Harbor County's knotweed working group and National Parks Service (NPS)

Resource Challenges icon
Prairie creek is a sub-watershed of the Quinault River. The Quinault River has potential Bull Trout habitat and Prairie Creek is a salmon bearing stream: Coho, Chinook, Chum and also Steelhead. Knotweed is an invasive species that changes the vegetative make-up of the streamside from a diverse species mix of native species to a monoculture of Knotweed. In the long run this change could affect water quality, fish and aquatic habitat as well as wildlife habitat that frequent riparian areas.

Conservation Program Used icon
Salmon Recovery Fund Board monies were used to treat the Knotweed in the streams/riparian corridors. NRCS, through Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP), funds were used for the creation of a Pest Management plan and to treat Knotweed along the transportation systems. Knotweed can be easily transported on vehicles just driving down the road and through the road's ditch system during storm events. NRCS-EQIP is also providing funding for planting acres of native tree species within the riparian area.

Innovations and Highlights icon
This is an effective partnership, with each agency or organization funding part of the project and the QIN effectively implementing each of the parts in a timely manner. The QIN has been part of the Knotweed working group for several years and has watched the development and testing of different technologies for treatment The Quinaults are effectively using a combination of these technologies to tackle this huge invasive species, affecting water quality, fish and wildlife habitat.

Results and Accomplishments icon
The Quinaults have completed the development of their Pest Management plan and first year of treatment. This plan may take up to three years to complete.

Contact icon
Carri Gaines, NRCS Quinault Tribal Liaison, (360) 276-8215 ext. 275


NRCS, 2-2008