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Dryland farmer uses system approach to combat wind erosion

Highlights in Conservation icon

Dryland farmer uses system approach to combat wind erosion

Plantings help stabilize and protect a critical area draw from further erosion.

Plantings help stabilize and protect a critical area draw from further erosion.

Location icon
Adams County, near Ritzville

Project Summary icon
Allan Koch, of A K Farms Inc., has utilized residue management, cross wind ridges and field borders to reduce wind erosion and blowing dust. He established a critical area planting to treat concentrated flow erosion. Allan has established shrub plots for wildlife using fabric mulch.

Conservation Partners icon
Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), A K Farms Inc.

Resource Challenges icon
Farming in a ten-inch rainfall zone with a crop only once every 2 years can make holding the soil in place a challenge. Establishing shrub plots in this dry area requires proper technique and extra effort.

Conservation Program Used icon
NRCS - Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP)

Innovations and Highlights icon
While most farmers in this area utilize some level of minimal tillage efforts to reduce wind and water erosion, seeding perpendicular to the wind with deep furrow drills is not a commonly adopted practice. Field borders can help hold the soil in place at field edges and also provide wildlife habitat. Using fabric mulch in low rainfall areas helps conserve moisture for tree and shrub plantings. Successful plantings seen in this area often require supplemental water during establishment.

Results and Accomplishments icon
Wind erosion and blowing dust have been significantly reduced. Concentrated flow erosion has been stabilized and wildlife habitat has been established. Allan has plans for another field border and a hedgerow planting.

Contact icon
Dick Erickson, Ritzville Field Office, (509) 659-1761

NRCS, Spring 2007