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Forest Management Practices Offered in WHIP Forestry Initiative Help Rebuild Wildlife Habitat

Forest Management Practices Offered in WHIP Forestry Initiative Help Rebuild Wildlife Habitat

Forest Management Practices Offered in WHIP Forestry Initiative Help Rebuild Wildlife Habitat

Tree pruning on the Carr property in Enosburg, Vermont

NRCS Helps Landowners Protect Environmental and Cultural Resources Through Forest Improvement

ENOSBURG, VERMONT, October, 2011 - Richard Carr of Enosburg, Vermont knew his forest and fields were valuable resources that needed to be improved and protected from development. Besides playing an important cultural role in Vermont, forests improve the lives of all who live here by providing numerous environmental and economic benefits. Through the Wildlife Habitat Incentive Program (WHIP) New England/New York Forestry Initiative, Carr has been able to improve his forest quality and enhance wildlife habitat. NRCS technical assistance helped Carr formulate a strategy for achieving his forest management goals when he enrolled 12 acres of land into the WHIP Forestry Initiative in 2010.

Forest stand improvement practices allowed for thinning of over-crowded forest stands to favor healthy, well-formed trees.  The growth rate of the trees left behind after thinning will result in a higher value investment for Carr who can sell those trees for timber in the future, or use them to produce maple syrup. In addition, the thinning practices are improving forest wildlife habitat by increasing fruit or seed production of the remaining trees and promoting regeneration and cover in the understory.  An existing early successional area of young woody growth was expanded with habitat management practices to provide better quality habitat for both declining nongame and game species of wildlife.  Carr is now working collaboratively with his neighbors to insure their forest remains healthy and protected.