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Claflin Family Farm Conserved Through Collaboration

Claflin Family Farm Conserved Through Collaboration

Claflin Family Farm Conserved Through Collaboration

 

Claflin family poses for a picture in front of farm that has been resently conserved through a conservation easement.

 

For three generations, the Claflins have farmed a scenic stretch of open land on Old Hollow Road in Monkton and Ferrisburgh. Sid Claflin and his three sisters—Barbara, Dawn, and Lela—have now permanently conserved the farm, with the help of the Vermont Land Trust. The easement sale helped the family settle the estate after their mother’s death, and now Sid is the sole owner of the land. “Conserving the farm was the right choice for our family,” said Sid. “Since I own it now, I can reinvest in the farm. And it gives me the peace of mind that all my work won’t be lost to development someday.” Soon after conserving the farm, Sid bought a herd of cows and started milking again.

A grant from the Monkton Agricultural and Natural Areas Fund was instrumental in conserving this farm. “Three and a half years ago the Monkton voters started setting aside funds to conserve agricultural lands and natural areas,” said Stephen Pilcher, a member of the Monkton Selectboard. “The Claflin Farm is one of the gateways into Monkton and preserving it as agricultural land is consistent with [the town’s] rural character.” This project was made possible with funding from Vermont Housing and Conservation Board (VHCB), the United States Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service (USDA NRCS), and the Town of Monkton. (November 2010)