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Virginia Soil Health Champions

NRCS Soil Health Contacts

Chris Lawrence, Cropland Agronomist J.B. Daniel, Forage & Grassland Agronomist

Chris Lawrence
Cropland Agronomist
PH: 804-287-1680
Email:
chris.lawrence@va.usda.gov

J.B. Daniel
Forage & Grassland Agronomist
PH: 434-392-4171, ext. 115
Email:
j.b.daniel@va.usda.gov

Local Soil Health Advocates

Many Virginia farmers are already implementing soil health concepts and soil health management systems into their operations. These no-till farmers are helping to us spread the word about the benefits of soil health practices.

Anthony Beery In the fight to keep their farms both sustainable and profitable, Virginia growers like Anthony Beery are taking a page from the sports playbook by going on the offensive with management systems that defend against opponents of soil health and productivity. For the Shenandoah Valley grower, these opponents were compaction and erosion. An extension workshop on compaction got Beery thinking and helped him start his own soil health playbook.

Read more (PDF, 1.4MB).

 

Terry Ingram

In 2003, Terry Ingram took over management of the Culpeper County farm where he was born and raised, and set out to convert his land into a 100 percent organic, grass-fed dairy farm. Since then, he says he's gotten much more in tune with feeding the soil and can actually see the return on that effort. Ingram has grass when other people don’t because healthy soil retains water so much better.

Read more (PDF, 2.2MB).

Copyright © Environmental Working Group, www.ewg.org. Reprinted with permission.

J.C. Winstead With the price of grain and fertilizer, Craig County grazier J.C. Winstead says good forage management has never been more important to cattlemen than it is today. He recognizes that healthy soil is better equipped to supply nutrients and moisture to forages, which factors directly into his bottom line at the end of the year.

Read more (PDF, 1MB).


Jay Hundley, Essex County

"You've got to remember that the soil is alive. It's an organism and you have to feed it like any other living thing that you raise in that field."

Jay Hundley, Essex County

Junior Beachy, Augusta County "I concluded that we were beating our soil to death. Now, you can take a shovel or spade to the field and always find earthworm passages. The soil has a structure to it that it didn't have before."

Junior Beachy, Augusta County

 

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