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Native Grasses Planted as Part of Education Program

Native Grasses Planted as Part of Education Program

14 grass samples for local residents to view

Courtesy of Giddings Times and News, May 26, 2010

Fourteen samples of native grasses were planted at Landmark Square in Giddings last Friday morning as part of the United States Department of Agriculture-Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) new educational initiative � the People�s Garden.

District Conservationist Grant Teplicek, with help from Alton Weiser, planted the grass and seeds on the northeast corner of Landmark Square.
�The samples are the kinds of grasses that were here when settlers first got here. Labels to identify each of the grass samples will be put in this week so that local residents can view them as they grow,� said Mr. Teplicek.

This government program is geared toward illustrating how America�s farmers work to protect and preserve the land as they produce a sustainable, safe and nutritious U.S. food supply.

Across the state, Texans will have opportunities to volunteer and visit a variety of gardens that connect people to their food source, while teaching conservation practices for soil, water and air.

Other types of People�s Gardens being developed include: traditional gardens with fruits, vegetables, herbs, etc; crop or conservation practice demonstration gardens, organic gardens, rain gardens or roof gardens, children�s gardens, and pollinator or butterfly gardens.

Grant Teplicek, District Conservationist in Giddings, worked with the Giddings Economic Development Board to plant native grasses around the Train Depot in Giddings. Teplicek will be able to use this People's Garden to help producers identify the native grasses they have on their places as well as show them how each one will benefit wildlife. Alton Weiser, caretaker at the Train Depot, assists Teplicek with the planting.

FFA and 4-H wildlife and range judging teams will be able to utilize the People's Garden for contest training, for such events as the West of the Brazos Wildlife and Land Judging Contest held each year by the NRCS and the five soil and water conservation districts in Austin, Washington, Burleson, Lee and Fayette.

Grant Teplicek, District Conservationist in Giddings, worked with the Giddings Economic Development Board to plant native grasses around the Train Depot in Giddings. Teplicek will be able to use this People's Garden to help producers identify the native grasses they have on their places as well as show them how each one will benefit wildlife. Alton Weiser, caretaker at the Train Depot, assists Teplicek with the planting.

FFA and 4-H wildlife and range judging teams will be able to utilize the People's Garden for contest training, for such events as the West of the Brazos Wildlife and Land Judging Contest held each year by the NRCS and the five soil and water conservation districts in Austin, Washington, Burleson, Lee and Fayette.