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Feral Hog Workshop Provides Options to Landowners

Feral Hog Workshop Provides Options to Landowners

Story by Jerry Pearce

Over 50 landowners plagued by the feral swine attended a feral hog workshop on October 21, 2010, in Goliad. The workshop informed landowners about the history, lifecycle, and potential control methods for managing local populations. A slate of seven speakers representing state, federal and private concerns provided background information along with specific recommendations to landowners. The day-long workshop was sponsored by the De-Go-La Resource Conservation and Development (RC&D) Council, Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), San Antonio River Authority, and Texas AgriLife Extension Service, in Goliad.

�This is one of the best workshops I have ever been involved with,� stated Jerry Pearce, coordinator for De-Go-La RC&D. �I think we hit the right subject at the right time with this being just prior to hunting season. You could tell the workshop attendees were interested because they just kept asking questions and getting good answers. This is good information for our area because many people are just at the end of the rope as far as feral hogs are concerned.�

Every year feral hogs account for millions of dollars in damage to crops and other land uses, as well as wildlife and livestock losses. Due to their prolific reproduction rate, one female hog can be responsible for creating up to 300 offspring in less than two years. Consequently, control methods such as trapping, as well as shooting, must be integrated to keep the population in check.

�Our goal in this workshop was to educate landowners to the fact that they have options to help control feral hogs including live-trapping and selling them as a cash crop,� said Brian Yanta, Goliad AgriLife Extension agent. �There is a great demand for feral swine in the European and organic meat markets, and we have plenty of hogs to provide to those markets with a cash return to our land users.�

More than 50 landowners learned about feral hog control such as live-trapping and selling them as a cash crop.

The skull in the background shows normal incisor teeth (tusks). The skull in the foreground is of a hog missing the upper incisor and how the lower tusk continued to grow without sharpening action.

More than 50 landowners learned about feral hog control such as live-trapping and selling them as a cash crop.

The skull in the background shows normal incisor teeth (tusks). The skull in the foreground is of a hog missing the upper incisor and how the lower tusk continued to grow without sharpening action.