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Conservation Station Field Day

Conservation Station Field Day

Story by Ebony Benton

On May 5th more than 250 students from area schools traveled to the Reeves County Rodeo Grounds in Pecos, Texas and filled up their knowledge tanks at the 1st Annual Conservation Station Field Day. The field day was sponsored by the Upper Pecos Soil and Water Conservation District, Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), and Texas AgriLife. Participating students from Pecos, Monahans, Kermit, and Grandfalls-Royalty traveled through 9 stations learning things from Africanized Killer bees to the history of mesquite trees. Dr. Mark Muegge, Texas AgriLife, had a stinging presentation on the difference between Honey Bees and Africanized Killer Bees. Students also learned how to respect bees, how to recognize nests, and ways to keep from being stung.

Logan Lair, local county extension agent, captured their attention by showing students how to build a wildlife guzzler and capture rainwater for wildlife. Afterwards, all eyes moved toward Alan Armistead from Wildlife Services as he explained all the animal skeletons and skulls on display. Wildlife predation was a hot topic for the morning.

Local NRCS engineers, Jack Canon and Isaac Martinez provided students an opportunity to learn about engineering surveying principles and equipment in the application of conservation practices on cropland and rangeland. Conservation practices discussed included cropland practices such as irrigation pipelines, land leveling, drip irrigation, and irrigation ditch lining. Rangeland practices discussed were livestock pipelines, watering facilities, and diversion terraces. Students were presented a history of the application of surveying from old methods to the new improved technology.

Once students were done surveying the moved on to learn why Texas is the #1 state in beef production. Martin Lefevere, Farm Bureau representative, challenged students to think about how agriculture is a part of their everyday life.

As temperatures continued to increase Rusty Dowell, NRCS soil specialist, maintained their attention while discussing the types of soils in the Pecos Region, soil formation, and soil texture. As the rain began to fall in the simulator, students were given a better understanding of soil erosion. Amy Porter, District Technician, further explained watersheds and how water flows to the Pecos River.

Towards the end, students topped off their tanks learning about Rangeland Ecology taught by Alyson McDonald, Texas AgriLife. Greg Huber, Pecos Valley RC&D Coordinator sent them on their way with the history of mesquite trees.

Thank you to everyone who was able to donate and help make this day a success. Your continued supported is greatly appreciated.

NRCS engineers Jack Canon and Isaac Martinez teach students about engineering surveying principles and equipment in the application of conservation practices on cropland and rangeland.

Martin Lefevere from Farm Bureau asked students how many of them have ties to agriculture. He also informs students that Texas is the leader in Beef & Cotton Production.

NRCS engineers Jack Canon and Isaac Martinez teach students about engineering surveying principles and equipment in the application of conservation practices on cropland and rangeland.

Martin Lefevere from Farm Bureau asked students how many of them have ties to agriculture. He also informs students that Texas is the leader in Beef & Cotton Production.

Which pool would you swim in? Amy Porter, Upper Pecos SWCD District Technician, discusses how conservation practices are used to filter water. Rusty Dowell, San Angelo Zone Soil Scientist uses sieves to separate the different particles of soils to while explaining soil size as it pertains to sand, silt and clay.

Which pool would you swim in? Amy Porter, Upper Pecos SWCD District Technician, discusses how conservation practices are used to filter water.

Rusty Dowell, San Angelo Zone Soil Scientist uses sieves to separate the different particles of soils to while explaining soil size as it pertains to sand, silt and clay.

Alan Armistead of the Wildlife Service uses a display of skulls to capture students attention, while explaining wildlife predation. The history and origin of the Mesquite Trees was discussed by Greg Huber, Pecos Valley RC&D Coordinator.

Alan Armistead of the Wildlife Service uses a display of skulls to capture students attention, while explaining wildlife predation.

The history and origin of the Mesquite Trees was discussed by Greg Huber, Pecos Valley RC&D Coordinator.

 

Logan Lair, Texas AgriLife Extenstion agent builds a wildlife guzzlers and explains rainwater harvesting. Dr. Mark Muegge gives the sting on Honey Bees and Africanized Bees.

Logan Lair, Texas AgriLife Extenstion agent builds a wildlife guzzlers and explains rainwater harvesting.

Dr. Mark Muegge gives the sting on Honey Bees and Africanized Bees.