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Wetlands Reserve Program educate private landowners

Wetlands Reserve Program educate private landowners

Story by Beverly Moseley

Private landowners from Leon and Walker counties interested in learning more about the Natural Resources Conservation Service�s Wetlands Reserve Program, gathered recently in Centerville.

NRCS held the workshop in an effort to educate landowners about the voluntary program which is a part of the 2008 Farm Bill. Landowners were provided information on topics such as land eligibility, along with the application and contract process for enrolling eligible acres.

�You are not committed until you accept our final offer,� said Kim Wright, NRCS zone program liaison.

Landowners learned the basics of how easement values are determined on the three WRP enrollment options: a restoration cost-share agreement, a 30-year easement or a permanent easement.

Jim Rogers, NRCS wildlife biologist, spoke to attendees about how wetlands are some of the most biologically productive ecosystems in the world.

�Wetlands have been long regarded as wastelands,� Rogers said. �Today, we see the benefits of wetlands.�

The goal of WRP is to restore functional values on land, he added.

He also explained how wetlands can benefit wildlife, water storage and filtration, along with providing excellent sites for education and research.

Jim Rogers, NRCS wildlife biologist spoke recently at a Wetlands Reserve Program workshop held recently in Centerville. Attendees came from Leon and Walker counties. Jim Rogers, NRCS wildlife biologist spoke recently at a Wetlands Reserve Program workshop held recently in Centerville. Attendees came from Leon and Walker counties.
Jim Rogers, NRCS wildlife biologist spoke recently at a Wetlands Reserve Program workshop held recently in Centerville. Attendees came from Leon and Walker counties.