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Bryan Soil Scientists Attend Annual Workshop

Bryan Soil Scientists Attend Annual Workshop

Story by Jacob Bushong, Travis Waiser, and Richard Reid

Soil Scientists from the Soil Survey Office in Bryan as well as Soil Scientists around the state recently attended the 47th annual Soil Survey & Land Resource Workshop in College Station. The workshop was held on the Texas A&M campus February 4th and 5th, 2010.

The day and a half of oral presentations and training workshops included new initiatives, plans, educational efforts, research findings, consultancies, new methods and materials, and other topics that serve to further the development, use, and understanding of soil survey and closely related information.

Speakers, and those in attendance, included state NRCS personnel from Texas and New Mexico; national NRCS personnel from the National Soil Survey Center in Lincoln, Nebraska; university researchers from institutions in Texas, Louisiana, and Arkansas; undergraduate and graduate students from the soil sciences discipline; state regulatory officials; and private industry consultants.

There was an oral presentation contest for student researchers. Texas A&M, Texas Tech, West Texas A&M, and Louisiana State University were represented in the contest. These research projects are part of the cooperative effort between NRCS Soil Survey and AgriLife Extension within Texas A&M, to provide research data to be used in the field as well as prepare students as future soil scientists.

In conjunction with the workshop, NRCS personnel from the Texas State Office provided hands-on training using the Web Soil Survey, Soil Data Mart, and the Geospatial Data Gateway. This training was available for all those in attendance. If anyone is interested in learning about these programs, contact the soils staff.

The audience looks on during the presentation of the �Effects of Soil Specific Seeding Rates on Water Stress and Cotton Yield.�

The audience looks on during the presentation of the �Effects of Soil Specific Seeding Rates on Water Stress and Cotton Yield.�