Skip

jNSM Background

In response to a USDA-NRCS need to better understand soil climate in soil survey, the Java Newhall Simulation Model or jNSM was developed in 2011. jNSM is an update to a traditional soil climate simulation model called Newhall Simulation Model (NSM) by Franklin Newhall. Newhall’s model for soil moisture temperature regime determination (Newhall and Berdanier, 1992) was originally written in COBAL then re-implemented in GW-BASIC by Van Wambeke (Van Wambeke et al., 1992; Van Wambeke, 2000).

Click here for a YouTube video of a 1991 Newhall Simulation Model run.

The GW-BASIC version of the Newhall Simulation Model, known as Van Wambeke 1.0, was ported to the Java programming language for the current jNSM application. This Java implementation comprises the main computational engine of the jNSM application. jNSM, is a desktop client application that employs Java 5 (Oracle Corporation) and Adobe Flex. The Flex and the Java are integrated into an Adobe AIR executable application. Flex is used to manage the model input and the formatting of the output products of the application.

The jNSM application takes batch run input in the form of a CSV file (easily created from standard spreadsheets), and also allows interactive input of data comprising a single model run. Output products are displayed on the user’s monitor, and can be saved and printed in PDF format. Output reports include soil moisture and temperature regime classification1, biological window calendars and precipitation/potential evapo-transpiration climographs, plus a summary of model inputs and user information.

Each jNSM model run’s input and output are paired together and stored in XML format. jNSM requires serially complete monthly average values for precipitation and air temperature for at least one year. Soil available water capacity and the mean annual air temperature to mean annual soil temperature relationship can be adjusted to reflect local or regional conditions.

jNSM requires serially complete monthly average values for precipitation and air temperature inputs for at least one calendar year. Soil available water storage and the mean annual air temperature to mean annual soil temperature relationship can be adjusted to reflect local or regional conditions.

Output reports include soil moisture and temperature regime classification, biological window calendars and precipitation/potential evapo-transpiration climographs, plus a summary of model inputs and user information. The jNSM version 1.5.1 (and Companion CCE software called XML2CSV Conversion Tool version 1.2.0 - used to convert jNSM output XML files to CSV files) software has been CCE certified and is now ready for distribution to NRCS computers (NASIS Users) via SMS push around July 6, 2012.

The jNSM software is a mesoscale model that is appropriate for use in regional geospatial analyses that support the MLRA update of published digital soil geographic databases (SSURGO/STATSGO2). This software can be used with monthly, serially complete records from weather stations, Soil Climate Analysis Network (SCAN) stations, and local soil climate monitoring sensors.

Such data sources can be used with jNSM to refine soil moisture and temperature regime boundaries to assist in correlation, map soil and temperature regimes with existing vegetation, study orographic and “rain shadow” effects in the soil landscape, and study the change of soil climate through time to help formulate climate change adaptive strategies.

The jNSM version 1.5.1 application is a product of the National Cooperative Soil Survey partnership of the Pennsylvania State University (Center for Environmental Informatics) and the USDA-NRCS (National Soil Survey Center - Geospatial Research Unit).

Cooperative Ecological Studies Unit (CESU) #86-7482-9-527

1 Soil Climate terms include Soil Moisture Regime and Soil Temperature Regime classes as defined in Soil Taxonomy (1975) and Subgroup Modifiers (Tentative Subdivisions of Moisture Regimes) as proposed in Newhall source code (Van Wambeke, et al., 2000; and Van Wambeke, 1982) and not the moisture subgroups used in Keys to Soil Taxonomy (2010). Refer to the eleventh edition of the Keys to Soil Taxonomy (2010) for the current, approved definitions of the soil moisture and soil temperature regimes.
 

Sample Reports

jNSM v1.6.0 Report

A screen capture of a jNSM v1.6.0 Report.



jNSM v1.6.0 Climograph

A screen capture of a jNSM v1.6.0 Climograph.



jNSM v1.6.0 Model Run Summary

A screen capture of a jNSM v1.6.0 Model Run Summary.