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Hooksan Soils

Soil Map Unit Description from the RI Soil Survey Report (2010 Update)

HsB - Hooksan sand, 3 to 8 percent slopes (2010 Update for the RI Coastal Zone Soil Survey Phase I - please download the latest copy of the spatial data).

This very deep, undulating excessively drained soil is on vegetated sand dunes along the Coastal Zone in Washington County from Point Judith to Westerly. Hooksan soils are mapped on foredunes, convex coastal landforms, and areas between the ocean and coastal lagoons.

Typically, the surface layer is pale brown, loose sand about 20 inches thick. The upper part of the substratum also is pale brown, loose sand. The lower part to a depth of 65 inches or more is light yellowish brown, loose sand. Thin layers of dark minerals are also common throughout the profile.

Included with this soil in mapping are small areas of Bigapple soils on anthropogenic landforms, Succotash soils on lower elevations, areas of unvegetated beaches, and Sandyhook soils on tidal marshes. Included areas make up about 10 percent of this unit. Also included are areas with gravel and cobble size rock fragments covering the surface and within the soil profile.

Permeability is very rapid throughout the Hooksan soil. Available water capacity is very low. Depth to the seasonal high water table is more than 6 feet.

Most areas are vegetated with beach grasses, poison ivy, beach plum, red cedar, black cherry, smooth sumac, and green briar. Summer cottages, houses, and un-vegetated dunes are located in some areas.

This soil is unsuited to cultivated crops, hay, and pasture because of droughtiness, low fertility, and erosion hazard.

This soil is poorly suited to trees. Establishing trees is difficult because of the droughtiness and low fertility and erosion of the soil. Because the soil is close to salt water, the strong prevailing winds and salt spray severely limit tree growth. The common vegetation includes beachgrass, poison ivy, beach plum, and bayberry.

This soil is generally unsuited to most nonfarm uses because of the very rapid permeability and the susceptibility to erosion during storm wash-over events. This soil is unsuited for on-site septic systems due to poor filtering capacity and areas are subject to severe erosion during storm events.

Official Series Description: https://soilseries.sc.egov.usda.gov/OSD_Docs/H/HOOKSAN.html

 

HsC - Hooksan sand, 8 to 15 percent slopes (2010 Update for the RI Coastal Zone Soil Survey Phase I - please download the latest copy of the spatial data).

This very deep, undulating excessively drained soil is on vegetated sand dunes along the Coastal Zone in Washington County from Point Judith to Westerly. Hooksan soils are mapped on foredunes, convex coastal landforms, and areas between the ocean and coastal lagoons.

Typically, the surface layer is pale brown, loose sand about 20 inches thick. The upper part of the substratum also is pale brown, loose sand. The lower part to a depth of 65 inches or more is light yellowish brown, loose sand. Thin layers of dark minerals are also common throughout the profile.

Included with this soil in mapping are small areas of Bigapple soils on anthropogenic landforms, Succotash soils on lower elevations, areas of unvegetated beachs, and Sandyhook soils on tidal marshes. Slopes in excess of 15 percent are also common in some areas. Also included are areas with gravel and cobble size rock fragments covering the surface and within the soil profile. Included areas make up about 10 percent of this unit.

Permeability is very rapid throughout the Hooksan soil. Available water capacity is very low. Depth to the seasonal high water table is more than 6 feet.

Most areas are vegetated with beach grasses, poison ivy, beach plum, red cedar, black cherry, smooth sumac, and green briar. Summer cottages, houses, and un-vegetated dunes are located in some areas.

This soil is unsuited to cultivated crops, hay, and pasture because of droughtiness, low fertility, and the slope.

This soil is poorly suited to trees. Establishing trees is difficult because of the droughtiness, erosion hazard, and low fertility of the soil. Because the soil is close to salt water, the strong prevailing winds and salt spray severely limit tree growth. The common vegetation includes beachgrass, poison ivy, beach plum, and bayberry.

This soil is generally unsuited to most nonfarm uses because of the very rapid permeability and the susceptibility to erosion during storm wash-over events. This soil is unsuited for on-site septic systems due to poor filtering capacity and areas are subject to severe erosion during storm events.

Official Series Description: https://soilseries.sc.egov.usda.gov/OSD_Docs/H/HOOKSAN.html

HU - Hooksan - Urbanland Complex, 1 to 8 percent slopes (2010 Update for the RI Coastal Zone Soil Survey Phase I - please download the latest copy of the spatial data).

This map unit consist of approximately 50% Hooksan soil and 40 % areas of impervious pavement and buildings.  Hooksan soils are very deep, undulating excessively drained soils on vegetated sand dunes along the Coastal Zone along Washington County from Point Judith to Westerly. Hooksan soils are mapped on foredunes, convex coastal landforms, and areas between the ocean and coastal lagoons.

Typically, the surface layer of Hooksan soil is pale brown, loose sand about 20 inches thick. The upper part of the substratum also is pale brown, loose sand. The lower part to a depth of 65 inches or more is light yellowish brown, loose sand. Thin layers of dark minerals are also common throughout the profile.

Included with this soil in mapping are small areas of Bigapple soils on anthropogenic landforms, Succotash soils on lower elevations, areas of unvegetated beachs, and Sandyhook soils on tidal marshes. Included areas make up about 10 percent of this unit.

Permeability is very rapid throughout the Hooksan soil. Available water capacity is very low. Depth to the seasonal high water table is more than 6 feet.

Most areas are used for development of houses, parking lots, cottages and other anthropogenic uses. Vegetation is typically beach grass, beach plum, poison ivy or lawns.

This soil is generally unsuited to most nonfarm uses because of the very rapid permeability and the susceptibility to erosion during storm wash-over events.

Official Series Description: https://soilseries.sc.egov.usda.gov/OSD_Docs/H/HOOKSAN.html

 

UPDATE: The Coastal Zone of Rhode Island is currently being updated and re-mapped, for more information on this update visit: www.mapcoast.org