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Napatree Subaqueous Soils

Soil Map Unit Description from the RI Soil Survey Report (2010 Update)

WNe0: Napatree sand, 0 to 1 meter water depth, bouldery surface (2010 Update for the RI Coastal Zone Soil Survey Phase I - please download the latest copy of the spatial data).

This subaqueous soil is on bouldery mainland coves adjacent to glaciated uplands with numerous boulders and stones. Napatree soils are formed in sandy marine deposits overlying submerged terrestrial loess or till deposits. Mapped areas are irregular in shape and range from 0.5 to 22 hectares (1 to 56 acres). Slope ranges from 0 to 5 percent.

Typically, this soil has a firm, black or very dark grayish brown sand surface layer, 15 to 30 cm thick. The subsoil is olive brown sandy loam, 20 to 35 cm thick. The substratum is dark grayish brown or gray silt loam, sandy loam, or loamy sand glacial deposits. Some pedons have a bright subsoil layer interpreted as a buried terrestrial soil or associated with fresh water inputs.

This soil is permanently submerged with up to 1 meter of salt or brackish water except for some of the surface boulders that are exposed to the air during low tides. All horizons have a neutral pH in place and some horizons may develop a strongly acidic pH after oxidation.

The potential for submarine fresh ground water discharge zones are high given the geomorphic position and high saturated hydraulic conductivity.

Included with this soil in mapping are small areas of Anguilla soils adjacent to landscapes dominated by outwash material in mainland coves and mainland submerged beaches. Small areas of Fort Neck soils may also be included in low energy areas where fluid sulfidic materials have been deposited on the surface. Billington and Pishagqua soils may also be included in deeper, low energy areas as well. Included areas make up about 15 percent of this map unit.

Shellfish cultivation is very important in these soils (including clams, lobsters, and oysters). Fishing is also common in the areas within this map unit. Some areas are vegetated with native algae and eelgrass (Zostera marina).

Link to Official Series Description - Napatree| Soil Profile Photo of NaPATREE Series

UPDATE: The Coastal Zone of Rhode Island is currently being updated and re-mapped, for more information on this update visit: www.mapcoast.org


WNx0: Napatree sand, 0 to 1 meter water depth, extremely bouldery surface (2010 Update for the RI Coastal Zone Soil Survey Phase I - please download the latest copy of the spatial data).

This subaqueous soil is on very bouldery mainland coves adjacent to glaciated uplands with numerous boulders and stones. Napatree soils are formed in sandy marine deposits overlying submerged terrestrial loess or till deposits. Mapped areas are irregular in shape and range from 0.5 to 10 hectares (1 to 25 acres). Slope ranges from 0 to 5 percent.

Typically, this soil has a firm, black or very dark grayish brown sand surface layer, 15 to 30 cm thick. The subsoil is olive brown sandy loam, 20 to 35 cm thick. The substratum is dark grayish brown or gray silt loam, sandy loam, or loamy sand glacial deposits. Some pedons have a bright subsoil layer interpreted as a buried terrestrial soil or associated with fresh water inputs.

This soil is permanently submerged with up to 1 meter of salt or brackish water except for some of the surface boulders that are exposed to the air during low tides. All horizons have a neutral pH in place and some horizons may develop a strongly acidic pH after oxidation.

The potential for submarine fresh ground water discharge zones are high given the geomorphic position and high saturated hydraulic conductivity.

Included with this soil in mapping are small areas of Anguilla soils adjacent to landscapes dominated by outwash material in mainland coves and mainland submerged beaches. Small areas of Fort Neck soils may also be included in low energy areas where fluid sulfidic materials have been deposited on the surface. Billington and Pishagqua soils may also be included in deeper, low energy areas as well. Included areas make up about 15 percent of this map unit.

Shellfish cultivation is very important in these soils (including clams, lobsters, and oysters). Fishing is also common in the areas within this map unit. Some areas are vegetated with native algae and eelgrass (Zostera marina).

 

Link to Official Series Description - Napatree| Soil Profile Photo of NaPATREE Series

 

UPDATE: The Coastal Zone of Rhode Island is currently being updated and re-mapped, for more information on this update visit: www.mapcoast.org