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Douglas County - Information for Partners and Participants

Restoration of the declining oak habitat found throughout Douglas County.

Restoration of the declining oak habitat found throughout Douglas County.

Douglas County is in the southwest part of Oregon in the Umpqua River valley and stretches from the Crater Lake in the Cascade Mountains to the Pacific Ocean at Reedsport. Historically, Douglas County's economy has been based on timber and agriculture. Agriculture is important because of the fertile soil and moderate climate that exists in the Umpqua Valley, making this valley one of the most productive timber and grazing areas in the nation. Agricultural covers much of the valley floor and extended in to the foothills with timber production in the foothills and the Cascade and Coast Range mountains. Timber production, livestock production and viticulture occur on the highly productive agricultural soils.
 

NRCS Local Conservation Activities and Strategies

The NRCS and Local Work Group have identified forest health and invasive plant species on grazing lands as the priority resource concerns. Forest health concerns include declining oak woodland/savanna habitat and wildfire hazard. Pasture management concerns include invasive brush species control, need for improved livestock water systems and cross fencing.

Conservation Implementation Strategy


NRCS Programs Available


Additional Conservation Resources Available

The NRCS works cooperatively with a variety of partners including:

  • Douglas Soil and Water Conservation District
  • Umpqua Soil and Water Conservation District
  • Partners for the Umpqua Watershed Council
  • Elk Creek Watershed Council
  • Smith River Watershed Council
  • USDA Farm Service Agency
  • Oregon Department of Forestry
  • Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife
  • U S Fish and Wildlife


Local Work Group Updates

The Local working group is a collaborative group of agencies and organizations working on conservation in the region. They assemble annually to share information and provide input and suggestions to the development of strategies and programs in the county. Please contact the district conservationist if you would like to participate or be included in information sharing.

For meeting information, please click here.


Success Stories

Rancher Sherril Wells (left) discusses his grazing management strategies with NRCS District Conservationist David Chain

Grazing Management for Healthy Pastures, Animals
The Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) helps producers manage pastures to benefit soil, water, wildlife and the bottom line.

Sherril Wells used to start feeding hay to his livestock in August each year. Now, thanks to a rotational grazing system he put in place with assistance through the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP), the cattle and sheep are able to feed on his pastures’ standing grass until October.  More...

Key Words:  EQIP, conservation planning, grazing management, Southwest Oregon Basin

NRCS District Conservationist David Chain (left) with landowners Ron Hjort and Mike Horton.

Collaboration: Key Element of a Healthy Watershed
Stream to stream, landowner to landowner, and agency to agency – resources and people are all interconnected, vital to the natural system.

The waters of Pollock Creek empty into Calapooya Creek and flow through the Umpqua to Winchester Bay on the southern Oregon coast. The course runs through an array of forest, pasture, native prairie and savannah lands. Numerous wildlife species use these areas, including coho, steelhead, Chinook, and lamprey, as well as an abundance of birds and mammals including white tail deer. While small, Pollock Creek is an important vein feeding the interdependent processes vital to the health of this complex system.  More...

Key Words:  Cooperative conservation, watershed health, CREP, EQIP, ranch land, stream buffers, Southwest Oregon Basin



 

Clickable Map of SNOTEL Sites

 

For Additional Assistance Contact

Roseburg Service Center
2593 NW Kline Street
Roseburg, Oregon 97471

NRCS District Conservationist:  David Chain, (541) 673-6071

Control of invasive brush species like Armenian Blackberry which has taken over much of the forest lands.

Control of invasive brush species like Armenian Blackberry which has taken over much of the forest lands.
The newly installed cross fence facilitates rotational grazing and helping to improve forage quality and quantity.

The newly installed cross fence facilitates rotational grazing and helping to improve forage quality and quantity.