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Curry County - Information for Partners and Participants

Trees planted in riparian area increase shade for water and to improve buffering capacity to help keep streams clean and cool

Trees planted in riparian area increase shade for water and to improve buffering capacity to help keep streams clean and cool.

Curry County is characterized by coastal terraces, very narrow river valleys and rugged mountains. Of the one million acres, only 34% is privately owned. Curry County is in the Coast Range and Klamath Mountain Ecoregions. It is drained by the Rogue and Illinois Rivers with several smaller rivers and creeks draining directly to the Pacific Ocean. Temperatures are mild throughout the year and the 70-160 inches of rain is concentrated in the winter. The natural resources in the area support forestry, recreational and commercial fishing, sheep and cattle ranching and specialty crop production. The population is 21,941 with only two towns of significant size.


NRCS Local Conservation Activities and Strategies

The highest priority resource concerns identified in Coos and Curry Counties include: water quality, water quantity, forest health and wildlife populations. NRCS is currently pursuing two strategies relating to water quality and quantity. The Agricultural Water Quality and Quantity strategy is currently focused on livestock and irrigation management in specific areas of the Sixes Watershed basin. The Cranberry Irrigation Automation Strategy is focused on improving management of water resources in cranberry operations.

Conservation Implementation Strategy


NRCS Programs Available

  • Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP):
    • Improve growth and vigor of pasture to promote sustainable permanent cover of desired vegetation through Forage planting, brush and weed control, cross fencing, and grazing management.
    • Install alternative livestock watering facilities and heavy use area improvements to protect stream corridors and improve health of riparian areas.
    • Upgrade equipment and improve pump utilization, reduce runoff and the amount of water withdrawn for irrigation purposes.
    • Water savings through irrigation efficiency.
    • Improve nutrient management and nutrient cycling, crop health and productivity.
    • Improve water quality through management enhancements requiring less pesticides, insecticides and herbicides.
  • Conservation Stewardship Program (CSP):
    • • Support for qualified stewardship activities and enhancements.
  • Seasonal High Tunnel Initiative
  • EQIP Organic Initiative


Additional Conservation Resources Available

Conservation agencies in the region are very cooperative and routinely work together with private landowners to accomplish resource enhancement projects. The following agencies provide assistance in planning, funding or implementing conservation and restoration projects:

  • Curry SWCD
  • Farm Service Agency
  • Lower Rogue Watershed Council
  • Oregon Department of Agriculture
  • Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife
  • Oregon DEQ
  • OSU Extension
  • Southcoast Watershed Council
  • Oregon Department of Forestry


Local Work Group Updates

The Local working group is a collaborative group of agencies and organizations working on conservation in the region. They assemble annually to share information and provide input and suggestions to the development of strategies and programs in the county. Please contact the district conservationist if you would like to participate or be included in information sharing.

For meeting information, please click here.


For Additional Assistance Contact

Coquille Service Center
382 North Central
Coquille, Oregon 97423-1296

NRCS District Conservationist:  Amy Wilson, (541) 396-2841
Curry County SWCD: (541) 247-2755

A wetland area is protected to maintain wildlife habitat and water quality

A wetland area is protected to maintain wildlife habitat and water quality.
Cranberries, a high value specialty crop, are grown in beds

Cranberries, a high value specialty crop, are grown in beds.