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Washington County - Information for Partners and Participants

Our mission is helping people help the land

Our mission is helping people help the land.

The Tualatin River Watershed primarily makes up Washington County. It is 712 square miles in area and is approximately 42 miles long and 29 miles wide. People use the Tualatin River for drinking water, industry, irrigation, livestock watering, and recreation. The quality and quantity of the water are very important to the people who live here. The NRCS office, located in Hillsboro, offers voluntary technical and financial assistance to private landowners/operators interested in natural resource conservation.


NRCS Local Conservation Activities and Strategies

NRCS, the Tualatin Soil and Water Conservation District and local partners established priorities for resource conservation in the watershed. Details of this process are available in the NRCS Washington County Strategic Plan. These priorities include improving public drinking water, reducing greenhouse gas emissions and improving energy efficiency, enhancing riparian areas, and improving biodiversity.

Conservation Implementation Strategy


NRCS Programs Available

  • Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP):
    • Helps agricultural operations improve energy efficiency and reduce greenhouse gases by planting trees, planting crops with the no-till method, installing energy-efficient pumps and variable frequency drive and installing drip irrigation systems.
    • Helps farm owners and operators enhance riparian areas along high priority streams by using consultants and technological improvements to manage pests, planting trees along streams, solving erosion problems and installing drip irrigation.
    • Helps non-industrial private forestland owners develop management plans to improve forest productivity and reduce greenhouse gases.
  • Wildlife Habitat Incentives Program (WHIP):
    • Helps private landowners and operators restore oak savannah ecosystems in order to improve biodiversity.
  • Wetland Reserve Program (WRP):
    • Helps farm operators and farm owners remove poorly drained land from production and restore wetlands in order to improve biodiversity and wildlife habitat.
  • Conservation Stewardship Program (CSP):
    • Funding available for farmers and foresters already implementing excellent conservation practices.
    • Requires at least one new conservation activity.
  • Riparian restoration programs:
    • o Funding for planting native trees and shrubs along streams to protect water quality and improve fish habitat.


Additional Conservation Resources Available


Local Work Group Updates

Want to help?

Tell us how you think our efforts can be most effective. You can contact us anytime to express a concern, but once each year our Local Work Group meets to formally discuss developing and implementing conservation projects. You are welcome to participate in the meetings.

If you are interested in participating, please contact the NRCS District Conservationist listed below.

For meeting information, please click here.


Success Story

FFA members LeeAnn Pallett and Korey Kelly conduct irrigation efficiency tests with assistance from NRCS student trainee, Garrett Duyck
FFA members learn about conservation while helping farmers save water

Driving through Oregon’s agricultural areas in the summer, it’s difficult to miss the variety of irrigation systems raining much-needed water over field after field of fruits, vegetables, grains and grasses.  More...

Key Words:  EQIP, irrigation water management, Lower Willamette Basin


 

Clickable Map of SNOTEL Sites

 

For Additional Assistance Contact

Hillsboro Field Office
1080 SW Baseline, Suite B-2
Hillsboro, Oregon 97123-3823

NRCS District Conservationist: Santiago Misquez (503) 648-3174 ext. 113
Tualatin Soil and Water Conservation District, (503) 648-3174 ext. 5

The Tualatin River drains most of Washington County.  The river provides drinking water, irrigation water, wildlife habitat and recreational opportunities

The Tualatin River drains most of Washington County. The river provides drinking water, irrigation water, wildlife habitat and recreational opportunities.
Washington County has large acreages of prime agricultural soils.  These soils, the mild climate and good supplies of irrigation water enable farmers to produce abundant crops of grain, ornamental plants, berries and vegetables

Washington County has large acreages of prime agricultural soils. These soils, the mild climate and good supplies of irrigation water enable farmers to produce abundant crops of grain, ornamental plants, berries and vegetables.