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Heavy Use Area Protection

Web image: Photo of concrete used to provide heavy use area protection in a barnyard area

Practice Code: 561
Reporting Unit: Acre (Ac.)

Heavy use area protection is the establishment of a stable surface with suitable materials and any needed structures to protect areas heavily impacted by livestock, vehicles or development.

Purposes and Benefits

  • Protection of heavy use areas reduces the runoff of nutrients and other pollutants that impact water quality
  • Prevents soil erosion by providing a stable surface for livestock or equipment
  • Maintains and/or improves livestock management and health

Web graphic: Raindrop and soilPhoto Gallery

Ground Disturbing Potential of Conservation Practices

This is a potential ground disturbing conservation practice. Any project with ground disturbing or potential ground disturbing practices planned may need to be submitted for review by the State Historic Preservation Officer and Tribal Historic Preservation Officers. Please see the Cultural Resources Review Process Flowchart for an outline of this process. View a list of conservation practices used in New York State, and their ground disturbing potential.   

Conservation Practice Support Documents

Support Documents for this conservation practice are available for download from an abbreviated version of Section IV of the NRCS Field Office Technical Guide (FOTG).

Web link image: Field Office Technical GuideAll support documents associated with this and other conservation practices are available at the NRCS Field Office Technical Guide Web site.

 

Related Conservation Practices

This practice is commonly used in a Conservation Management System with practices such as:

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your local NRCS office
NRCS New York Office Locator

Fence (382)
Pathogen Management (783)
Roof Runoff Structure (558)
Vegetated Treatment Area (635)
Watering Facility (614)

If you want to learn how you can protect natural resources on your farm or forestland, please contact your local NRCS office.

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