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Conservation Partnerships Resulting in Conservation On the Ground

Web image: A photo taken during the construction of a system to collect silage leachate. Click image for full screen view
Construction of a system to collect silage
leachate and distribute it over a Vegetated
Treatment Area (VTA)

Full screen view
Web image: A photo of a newly constructed vegetated treatment area for treating silage leachate. Click image for full screen view
A newly constructed vegetated treatment area
for treating silage leachate

Full screen view

March 22, 2012
North Java, New York, Wyoming County

Gus and Brian Youngers are the owners and operators of SREGNUOY Farms outside of North Java, New York. Gus Youngers, father of Brian Youngers, likes to point out their unique farm location. “It all starts with us,” Gus will you tell you. This is due to the farmstead being located along the top of two different watersheds with long steep slopes and lots of runoff.

The Younger’s fields are mostly up and down with only a few sloped less than 3%. The father and son have made excellent use of their conservation tillage and rotations to reduce soil and nutrient runoff through stripcropping, diversions, and rotating corn with hay on Highly Erodible Land (HEL).

The Youngers have successfully applied for funding under the NRCS's Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP). They have also been granted funding with the New York Agricultural Non-Point Source Pollution Abatement and Control Program through New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets which has contracted with the Wyoming County Soil and Water Conservation District (SWCD) located in Warsaw, New York to manage the project and money.

The sensitive topographical location of the farmstead meant that any conservation practices applied to reduce the silage leachate runoff and manure waste would be a “win” for the environment and also result in better management options and tools for the Youngers.

The SWCD took the lead with most of the designs and construction inspection being completed by their staff, and worked with NRCS and the Youngers to see the projects scheduled for 2011 were completed to NRCS specifications.

This story has two levels of success. The first being the application of additional conservation practices being applied to the land. The second is the ongoing partnerships between different government entities resulting in increased service to the customer.

With offices in nearly every county in the United States, NRCS works with landowners and communities to improve our soil, water, air, plants, wildlife, and energy use. If you are interested in how you can protect natural resources on your farm or forestland, please contact your county NRCS office.

Wyoming County Soil and Water Conservation District
New York Agricultural Non-Point Source Pollution Abatement and Control Grant Program

Media Contact: Public Affairs 315-477-6524

If you are a woman or Hispanic farmer and you believe you were denied farm loan benefits by USDA between 1981 and 2000, you may be eligible for compensation. For more information, call 1-888-508-4429 or visit www.farmerclaims.gov.

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