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Landowners in Lake Champlain Watershed Protect Special Bird Habitat

New Storage Facility Addresses Livestock Waste Concerns, Reduces Environmental Impacts

Web image:The original earthen lagoon manure storage was constructed in gravel soils where contaminants could leak into the ground water supply. Click image for full screen view
The original earthen lagoon manure storage
was constructed in gravel soils where
contaminants could potentially leak into the
ground water supply.

Full screen view
Web image: The manure storage tank allows the Lamport’s to better schedule their Nutrient Mangagement Plan by custom-spreadfing manure twice a year to maximize the waste's fertilizer value. Click image for full screen view
The manure storage tank allows the Lamport’s
to better schedule their Nutrient Management
Plan by custom-spreading manure twice a year
to maximize the waste’s fertilizer value.

Full screen view

Delaware County, New York, September 30, 2011

NRCS has partnered with the Watershed Agricultural Council (WAC) through an Agricultural Watershed Enhancement Program (AWEP) agreement to address livestock waste concerns in the New York City watershed. Since 2009, eight farms have been awarded AWEP contracts totaling $1,127,742 for livestock waste projects.

One project that has been completed is the Lamport manure storage tank in Delaware County. The original earthen lagoon manure storage was constructed in gravel soils where contaminants could potentially leak into the ground water supply. In addition, parts for the aging manure transfer pump were becoming increasingly hard to find. Plans were developed to install a new, 16 feet deep by 120 feet diameter, cast-in-place, concrete manure storage tank with a capacity of 1.3 million gallons.

Included in the plans was the replacement of the existing manure transfer pump system and modification of the barn cleaner system. A hydraulic, piston-style manure transfer pump was selected for use on the farm based on the type and consistency of the manure as well as its capability to handle large amounts of bedding hay entering the system. The original manure system had two barn cleaners running to the center of the barn where the manure was then pumped out to the storage.

The new design eliminated one of the barn cleaners, making the new system more efficient, as well as reducing operation and maintenance issues. The modified barn cleaner system now runs the length of the barn and terminates in a dedicated manure transfer pump and reception pit room constructed at the North end of the main dairy facility.

The manure storage tank allows the Lamport’s to better schedule their Nutrient Management Plan by custom-spreading manure twice a year to maximize the waste’s fertilizer value. Also, by spreading fewer times per year, they effectively reduce environmental impacts by targeting fields that benefit most and utilize dryer periods when surface runoff is minimal.

To further reduce environmental impacts, the new system also incorporates milking center waste, as the original system was out of date and in need of repair. Now, both project components meet current NRCS Conservation Practice Standards and Specifications. During the three-month installation, the farm continued using the old lagoon system already in place. Daily operations were disrupted for two days when the old pump system was decommissioned and transitioned to the new one.

With offices in nearly every county in the United States, NRCS works with landowners and communities to improve our soil, water, air, plants, wildlife, and energy use. If you are interested in how you can protect natural resources on your farm or forestland, please contact your county NRCS office.

Media Contact: Public Affairs 315-477-6524