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Land Capability Class, by State, 1997

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Description

This pie map contains a pie chart for each state and the nation. The pie slices reflect acres in various land capability classes as a percent of the total area of non-Federal land. The size of the pies is proportional to the amount of non- Federal land in the state, scaled between Rhode Island and Texas. The 32,502,700 acres in land capability class V (2% of the U.S. total) are not incorporated into the pies. The total national acreage is also provided. Land capability class definitions area as follows: Class I contains soils having few limitations for cultivation; Class II contains soils having some limitations for cultivation; Class III contains soils having severe limitations for cultivation; Class IV contains soils having very severe limitations for cultivation; Class V contains soils unsuited to cultivation, although pastures can be improved and benefits from proper management can be expected; Class VI contains soils unsuited to cultivation, although some may be used provided unusually intensive management is applied; Class VII contains soils unsuited to cultivation and having one or more limitations which cannot be corrected; Class VIII contains soils and landforms restricted to use as recreation, wildlife, water supply or asthetic purposes.

Cautions for this Product:
Data are not collected on Federal land. Land capability class V is not incorporated into the pies. Categories I and II have been combined, category I contains 2% of the total non-Federal land area. Categories VII and VII have also been combined, category VIII contain 2% of the non- Federal land area. The national pie is not proportional to the state pies.



Sources

Source: National Resources Inventory, 1997
Distributor: USDA-NRCS-RIAD
Reliability:
NRI sample data are generally reliable at the 95% confidence interval for state and certain broad substate area analyses. Generally, analyses that aggregate data points by smaller geographic areas and/or more specific criteria result in fewer data points for each aggregation and therefore less reliable estimates. NRI maps reflect national patterns rather than site- specific information.


Layers

Aggregate Layer: State
Other Layers Displayed:


Definitions

Land Capability Classes and Subclasses:
Capability class is the broadest category in the land capability classification system. Class codes 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 are used to represent both irrigated and nonirrigated land capability classes.
Class 1 soils have slight limitations that restrict their use.
Class 2 soils have moderate limitations that reduce the choice of plants or require moderate conservation practices.
Class 3 soils have severe limitations that reduce the choice of plants or require special conservation practices, or both.
Class 4 soils have very severe limitations that restrict the choice of plants or require very careful management, or both.
Class 5 soils have little or no hazard of erosion but have other limitations, impractical to remove, that limit their use mainly to pasture, range, forestland, or wildlife food and cover.
Class 6 soils have severe limitations that make them generally unsuited to cultivation and that limit their use mainly to pasture, range, forestland, or wildlife food and cover.
Class 7 soils have very severe limitations that make them unsuited to cultivation and that restrict their use mainly to grazing, forestland, or wildlife.
Class 8 soils and miscellaneous areas have limitations that preclude their use for commercial plant production and limit their use to recreation, wildlife, or water supply or for esthetic purposes.
Capability subclass is the second category in the land capability classification system. Class codes e, w, s, and c are used for land capability subclasses.
Subclass e is made up of soils for which the susceptibility to erosion is the dominant problem or hazard affecting their use. Erosion susceptibility and past erosion damage are the major soil factors that affect soils in this subclass.
Subclass w is made up of soils for which excess water is the dominant hazard or limitation affecting their use. Poor soil drainage, wetness, a high water table, and overflow are the factors that affect soils in this subclass.
Subclass s is made up of soils that have soil limitations within the rooting zone, such as shallowness of the rooting zone, stones, low moisture-holding capacity, low fertility that is difficult to correct, and salinity or sodium content.
Subclass c is made up of soils for which the climate (the temperature or lack of moisture) is the major hazard or limitation affecting their use.
The subclass represents the dominant limitation that determines the capability class. Within a capability class, where the kinds of limitations are essentially equal, the subclasses have the following priority: e, w, s, and c. Subclasses are not assigned to soils or miscellaneous areas in capability classes 1 and 8.


Product Information

Product ID: 6175
Production Date: 5/22/01
Product Type: Map


For additional information contact the Resources Inventory and Assessment Division. Please include the Product ID you are inquiring about. nri@wdc.usda.gov or 1400 Independence Avenue SW - P.O. Box 2890 - Washington D.C. 20013. If you use our analysis products, please be aware of our disclaimer.