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Table 2 summarizes the difference in total farm income between the two tillage methods and four cropping systems. The no-till continuous cropping system had total farm income of $75,275. The three conventional cropping systems had total farm incomes of $31,899 (Winter Wheat-Barley-Fallow rotation), $32,205 (Winter Wheat-Spring Wheat- Fallow rotation), and $32,565 (Winter Wheat-Fallow rotation). The no-till continuous cropping system had more than twice as much total farm income as compared to a conventional cropping system. This difference in total farm income occurred regardless of the cropping system used for conventional cropping.

Two of the farmers interviewed were following a conventional tillage system. Fallow was tilled conventionally rather that using a minimum till or no-till system. Four of the farmers interviewed were following a continuous cropping system using a no-till cropping system. Other crops grown that were not listed in Table 2 are: oats, recrop winter wheat, durum, soft white wheat, winter rye, corn and hay barley.

There was a large difference in yields for conventional tilled winter wheat between the two farmers interviewed. This was probably due to the different average yearly moisture levels between the two farms. Table 3 shows the total farm income when an average yield of 25 bushels is used for winter wheat. When an average yield of 32 bushels is used for winter wheat, the difference in total farm income between the three conventional tillage systems is similar (See Table 2). This is not the case when the average yield is 25 bushels per acre. The winter wheat-spring wheat-fallow rotation had $4,500 to $4,900 higher income than the other two cropping systems.

Table 4 shows the total farm income when the average yield for winter wheat was increased to 38 bushels. The conventional till cropping system with the larger total farm income changes. The winter wheat-fallow rotation had a $1,600 to $4,900 higher income than the other two cropping systems. Regardless of the yield used for winter wheat, the total farm income was always less than the income from the continuous cropping system.

The Soil Tillage Intensity Rating (STIR) for the no-till continuous cropping system was 3. The STIR for the conventional tillage Winter Wheat-Spring Wheat-Fallow rotation was 95. The STIR for the conventional tillage Winter Wheat-Barley-Fallow rotation and the Winter Wheat-Fallow rotation were similar since only 100 acres of barley was recropped and the rest of the rotation was crop-fallow. The STIR for the conventional tillage Winter Wheat-Fallow rotation was 114.