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Wildfire Rehabilitation Assistance

What can you do to protect your home and property after a wildfire?

If you encounter any problems with the file provided on this page, please contact Steve Becker at 406-587-6828.

This information is also available in Adobe Reader format.

Wildfire Rehabilitation Assistance: What can you do to protect your home and property after a wildfire? (PDF; 1.5 MB)

Has your property been affected by wildfire? Are you unsure about what to do now and who to turn to for help? There are many factors that can affect your property after a wildfire. Because the vegetation that usually holds the soil in place has burned, there is no longer an anchor to stop soil from eroding. This can cause a whole new set of concerns such as debris flows, stream degradation, and noxious weed invasion. There are actions you can take now to help protect your property and avoid further damage.

The information in this booklet may be useful to you in making decisions about what practices to implement and how to install them to avoid a situation like that shown below. For more help in properly planning, installing, and maintaining practices to conserve your resources, contact your local NRCS office.

On July 22, 2001, an intense storm created a debris torrent in a very small (only one-half mile long) ephemeral drainage in the Bitterroot Valley. These photos show the sequence of events. Practices to help you prevent or avert this type of event are included in this booklet.

Debris flow as it starts to build.
1. Debris flow as it starts to build
Water and debris against home.
2. Water and debris against home
One hour after start of debris flow.
3. One hour after start of debris flow

Additional wildfire rehabilitation information