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Scat Identification by Season and Feeding Activity

Photo shows several piles of winter scat.
Scat piles of several birds roosting together.

Clockers

Incubating females leave the nest twice a day and excrete large scat piles nearby called “clockers”. Clockers indicate that a sage-grouse nest is close by.

Photo of clocker-type scat.
Photo courtesy Big Horn Environmental Consultants
 

Cecal tar

Cecal tar is common in winter when birds are eating 100% sage leaves and their digestive systems are separating volatile oils from digestible parts.

Photo of cecal tar
Photo courtesy Big Horn Environmental Consultants

Spring, summer or fall foraging scat

Cecal tar is common in winter when birds are eating 100% sage leaves and their digestive systems are separating volatile oils from digestible parts.

Photo of single dropping
Photo courtesy Big Horn Environmental Consultants

Winter scat

Cecal tar is common in winter when birds are eating 100% sage leaves and their digestive systems are separating volatile oils from digestible parts.

Photo of winter scat