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Missouri 2010 National Resources Inventory Highlights

Total Cropland

Total cropland includes cultivated cropland, non-cultivated cropland and land enrolled in the Federal Conservation Reserve Program (CRP).

  • Between 1982 and 2010, acres of total cropland eroding above “T” fell from 7,584,200 to 4,160,700; a decrease of 3,423,500 acres or 45.1 percent. “T” is the maximum rate of annual soil erosion that will still permit crop productivity to be sustained economically and indefinitely.
  • As a percentage of total cropland acres, 50.9 percent were eroding above “T” in 1982 and 28.1 percent in 2010.
  • The largest reductions, in total acres and percentages, occurred on cropland eroding at a rate greater than 5T. Between 1982 and 2010, acres eroding above 5T dropped from 2,331,200 to 558,700; a decrease of 1,722,500 acres or 76.0 percent.
  • In 2010, 43.5 percent (6,435,500 acres) of Missouri’s 14,761,900 acres of total cropland was classified as highly erodible land (HEL).
  • In 2010, 47.9 percent (3,083,800 acres) of Missouri’s HEL total cropland was eroding at a rate above “T” as opposed to 79.0 percent (4,968,500 acres) in 1982.

Cultivated Cropland

Cultivated cropland comprises land in row crops and close-grown crops as well as hayland or pastureland that is in a rotation with row crops or close-grown crops.

  • From 1982 to 2010, Missouri’s cultivated cropland acreage declined from 13.05 million acres to 10.34 million acres; a reduction of 2.7 million acres or 20.7 percent.
  • 25 years of steady decline stopped at 10.22 million acres in 2007.
  • Between 2007 and 2010, cultivated cropland acreage grew from 10.22 million acres to 10.34 million acres; an increase of 126,000 acres or 1.2 percent.
  • 65 percent (108,000 acres) of the 2010 net acreage increase came from expired Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) land; 21.4 percent (35,700 acres) came from non-cultivated cropland; and 13.5 percent (22,500 acres) came from pastureland.
  • In 2010, Missouri ranked 11th highest nationally in acres of cultivated cropland.
  • Between 1982 and 2010, Missouri’s sheet and rill erosion rate on cultivated cropland declined from 10.75 tons/acre/year to 5.49 tons/acre/year; a decrease of 5.26 tons/acre/year or 48.9 percent.
  • Between 2007 and 2010, Missouri’s sheet and rill erosion rate increased from 5.22 tons/acre/year to 5.49 tons/acre/year; an increase of 0.27 tons/acre/year or 5.2 percent.
  • In 2010, Missouri had the 6th highest sheet and rill erosion rate in the country.
  • Between 1982 and 2010, acres of cultivated cropland eroding above “T” decreased from 7,500,000 to 4,106,000; a reduction of 3,393,600 acres or 45.2 percent.
  • In 2010, 33.7 percent (3,490,600 acres) of Missouri’s cultivated cropland was classified as highly erodible land (HEL).
  • In 2010, 86 percent (3,030,600 acres) of Missouri’s cultivated HEL land was eroding at a rate above “T”.

Non-Cultivated Cropland

Non-cultivated cropland includes permanent hayland and horticultural cropland.

  • From 1982 to 2010, Missouri’s non-cultivated cropland has steadily increased from 1,826,100 acres to 3,190,700 acres; an increase of 1,364,600 acres or 74.7 percent.
  • 65 percent (963,000 acres) of the net increase from 1982 to 2010 was gained from cultivated cropland and 35 percent (523,100 acres) came from pastureland.
  • In 2010, Missouri ranked 3rd highest nationally in acres of non-cultivated cropland.
  • Between 1982 and 2010, Missouri’s sheet and rill erosion rate on non-cultivated cropland declined from 0.96 tons/acre/year to 0.54 tons/acre/year; a reduction of 0.42 tons/acre/year or 43.7 percent.
  • Missouri’s 2010 sheet and rill erosion rate on non-cultivated cropland was ranked 18th highest nationally.
  • Between 1982 and 2010, non-cultivated cropland acres eroding above “T” went from 84,200 acres to 40,000 acres; a decrease of 44,200 acres or 47.5 percent.
  • In 2010, 61.2 percent (1,953,000 acres) of Missouri’s non-cultivated cropland was classified as highly erodible land (HEL).
  • In 2010, 1.9 percent (38,900 acres) of Missouri’s non-cultivated HEL cropland was eroding at a rate above “T”.

Conservation Reserve Program Land (CRP)

CRP is a Federal program that pays private landowners to convert highly erodible cropland to vegetative cover.

  • CRP acres declined from their peak of 1,465,000 acres in 2007 to 1,222,700 acres in 2010; a loss of 242,300 acres or 16.6 percent.
  • Approximately 44.6 percent (108,000 acres) of the 2010 net decrease went into cultivated cropland; 35.2 percent (85,400 acres) was converted to pastureland; 17.3 percent (42,000 acres) was converted to non-cultivated cropland; and 1.6 percent (4,000 acres) went into forest land.
  • In 2010, Missouri ranked 7th highest nationally in acres of CRP land.

Grassland

This combines pastureland, non-cultivated cropland and CRP lands.

  • Between 1982 and 2010, Missouri’s grassland acreage increased from 14,486,300 acres to 15,207,000 acres; an increase of 720,700 acres or 5 percent.
  • In 2010, Missouri ranked 13th highest nationally in grassland acres.

Wetlands

Wetlands are transitional between terrestrial and aquatic systems where the water table is usually at or near the surface or the land is covered by shallow water.

  • Wetland acres increased from 1,570,300 in 1997 to 1,665,800 in 2010; an increase of 95,500 acres or 6.0 percent.
  • In 2010, Missouri ranked 26th highest nationally in wetland acres.

Prime Farmland

Prime farmland has the best combination of physical and chemical characteristics for producing food, feed, forage, fiber, and oil seed crops and is also available for other uses.

  • Missouri’s prime farmland acreage dropped from 13,876,000 acres in 1982 to 13,610,200 acres in 2010; a reduction of 265,800 acres or 1.9 percent.
  • In 2010, 65.2 percent (8,887,100 acres) of Missouri’s 13,610,200 acres of prime farmland were cropland; 20.6 percent (2,807,400 acres) was pastureland; 9.6 percent (1,317,600 acres) was forest land; and 2.8 percent (391,800 acres) was CRP land.
  • In 2010, Missouri ranked 6th highest nationally in acres of prime farmland.

Developed Land

A combination of urban land, built-up land, and rural transportation land.

  • Urban and built-up land expanded from 2,171,000 acres in 1982 to 3,004,300 acres in 2010; an increase of 833,300 acres or 38.3 percent.
  • Approximately 41 percent (347,100 acres) was taken from forest land; 34 percent (282,900 acres) from pastureland; 20 percent (170,600 acres) from cultivated cropland; and 5 percent (42,600 acres) from non-cultivated cropland.
  • In 2010, Missouri ranked 13th highest nationally in acres of developed land.

Rural Land

Rural land includes cropland, CRP land, pastureland, rangeland, forest land, and other rural land.

  • Rural land decreased from 39,756,800 acres in 1982 to 38,818,100 acres in 2010; a decrease of 938,700 acres or 2.4 percent.
  • In 2010, Missouri ranked 13th highest nationally in acres of rural land.

Forest Land

Forest land is at least 10 percent stocked by single-stemmed woody species of any size that will be at least 4 meters (13 feet) tall at maturity.

  • Between 1982 and 2010, Missouri’s forest land acreage increased from 11,549,700 acres to 12,509,500 aces; a net increase of 959,800 acres or 8.3 percent.
  • Between 1982 and 2010, 85.2 percent (1,731,000 acres) of the land converted to forest land came from pastureland.
  • Between 1982 and 2010, 50.6 percent (542,500 acres) of forest land converted to other uses went to pastureland and 32.3 percent (347,100 acres) was converted to developed land.
  • Between 1982 and 2010, Missouri’s forest land acreage peaked in 2001 at 12,572,300 acres.
  • In 2010, Missouri ranked 18th highest nationally in forest land acres. 

MISSOURI 2010 NATIONAL RESOURCES INVENTORY SUMMARIES

NRI Grazing Land On-Site Study
The Grazing Land On-Site Study is a vital component of the NRI. Since 2003, on-site rangeland data has been collected in 20 states, excluding Missouri. In 2009, the Rangeland On-Site Study and the Pastureland On-Site pilot study, which included Missouri, were consolidated into an annual Grazing Land On-Site Study. Grazing land specialists and soil scientists visit NRI sample sites and collect data using protocols established and researched by the USDA-NRCS, the USDA-Agricultural Research Service, and the USDA-Bureau of Land Management. Types of data collected at each sample point include: land cover/use, landscape and soils, ecological site information, grassland health, invasive/noxious plants, conservation practices, resource concerns, plant composition and production.

  • 2010 NRI Grazing Land Field Study Handbook of Instructions