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Soil Health Producer Profiles

 

Dan Ley Soil Health Producer A Better Soil Quality Leads to a Better Quality of Life
Dan Ley has run the family dairy farm since 2006 and had a great example to follow as his dad started reduced tillage before he took the farm over. Dan’s father set the course for what he now is seeing to be a very profitable way to farm. His farm is 257 acres and it is 100% no-till. The Ley family started no-till in 2000 and saw the benefits in just two years. They had cut their time in the field which cut their fuel costs and led to a much higher net profit. 
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Do McKenzie Soil Health Producer Soil Health Builds Soil Consistency
Don McKenzie grew up moldboard plowing every acre of his family’s 350 acre farm. They rotated corn, soybean, wheat, alfalfa, and had steers in a feedlot. He took over the family farm in 1996 and continued these practices. This was what he had learned was the correct way to farm from his father and every neighbor around. Read more...
Jerry Houselog Soil Health Producer Strip Till and Cover Crops Work in Southern Minnesota's Corn Belt

Jerry Houselog farms 1,000 acres in Pipestone County Minnesota and took over his wife’s family farm in 1998. Jerry grew up in corn/soybean country with conventional farming practices and implementing all kinds of precision farming techniques. Precision farming has helped Jerry to drive his implements down the exact path so that he compacts less soil. Also, it can tell him just how much fertilizer to put on every acre that he owns to try and achieve better yields. Though these techniques help to compact less soil and use less fertilizer, Jerry has discovered something else that helps even more. Read more...

Kent Solberg Soil Health Producer Holistic Farming Enhances the Circle of Life
Kent Solberg knew he wanted to be a farmer from the time he was a freshman in high school. But it was an uphill climb for him since his family did not own a farm. Kent first educated himself on holistic farming, soil, and ecology at South Dakota State University and then at the University of Montana. Through his years of education he learned that holistic farming was the best way of not interrupting the ecosystem around him while still being able to farm. 
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