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CWPPRA

Coastal Wetlands Planning, Protection and Restoration Act (CWPPRA)

Staff Contact:

Britt Paul, Assistant State Conservationist for Water Resources 
Phone:(318) 473-7756
Fax: (318) 473-7632
CWPPRA Logo

In November 1990, Congress passed Public Law 101-646, the Coastal Wetlands Planning, Protect and Restoration Act (CWPPRA). The Act directed that a task force consisting of five federal agencies and the state of Louisiana develop a "comprehensive approach to restore and prevent the loss of coastal wetlands."

CWPPRA has been the State of Louisiana's primary tool for responding to coastal wetland losses. CWPPRA emphasizes intergovernmental cooperation. As of March 2013, there are 196 authorized CWPPRA projects, 100 have been constructed, 13 are under construction, and 38 have been de-authorized or transferred to another program. The remaining projects are in various stages of planning and design.

The CWPPRA program is managed by the CWPPRA Task Force. The Task Force is composed of the State of Louisiana and five federal agencies: the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), NOAA-National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). The Governor’s Office of Coastal Activities represents the state of Louisiana and the Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority (CPRA) serves as the local cost share partner for projects.

NRCS is the federal sponsor for 66 CWPPRA projects affecting 526,612 acres of Louisiana's valuable coastal wetlands. Construction has been completed on 39 projects. Restoration projects with NRCS as the federal sponsor include:

Natural Resources Facts:

Louisiana's coastal wetlands are a national treasure. The wetlands:

  • Support and protect a multi-billion dollar oil and gas industry.

  • Provide nursery grounds for fish and shellfish for much of the nation's seafood.

  • Protect over 400 million tons of waterborne commerce annually.

  • Provide winter habitat for about one-half of the Mississippi Flyway waterfowl population.

  • Serve as a buffer from hurricanes and storms.


Number 

Project Name
 
Number 

Project Name
BA-27c Barataria Basin Landbridge Shoreline Protection, Phase 3   CS-21 Highway 384 Hydrologic Restoration
BA-27d Barataria Basin Landbridge Shoreline Protection, Phase 4   CS-31 Holly Beach Sand Management
BA-27 Barataria Basin Landbridge Shoreline Protection, Phases 1 and 2   ME-11 Humble Canal Hydrologic Restoration
BA-26 Barataria Bay Waterway East Side Shoreline Protection   BA-20 Jonathan Davis Wetland Restoration
BA-23 Barataria Bay Waterway West Side Shoreline Protection   TV-17 Lake Portage Land Bridge
TV-20 Bayou Sale Shoreline Protection   ME-17 Little Pecan Bayou Hydrologic Restoration
CS-29 Black Bayou Culverts Hydrologic Restoration   BA-03c Naomi Outfall Management
TV-09 Boston Canal/Vermilion Bay Bank Protection   TV-13a Oaks/Avery Canal Hydrologic Restoration, Increment 1
TE-28 Brady Canal Hydrologic Restoration   TE-34 Penchant Basin Natural Resources Plan, Increment 1
CS-09 Brown Lake Hydrologic Restoration   CS-24 Perry Ridge Shore Protection
BS-03a Caernarvon Diversion Outfall Management   CS-25 Plowed Terraces Demonstration
CS-04a Cameron-Creole Maintenance   TE-29 Raccoon Island Breakwaters Demonstration
TV-16 Cheniere Au Tigre Sediment Trapping Demonstration   TE-48 Raccoon Island Shoreline Protection/Marsh Creation
LA-03b Coastwide Nutria Control Program   LA-09 Sediment Containment System for Marsh Creation Demonstration
TV-04 Cote Blanche Hydrologic Restoration   TE-39 South Lake De Cade Freshwater Introduction
CS-20 East Mud Lake Marsh Management   BA-41 South Shore of The Pen Shoreline Protection and Marsh Creation
TE-17 Falgout Canal Planting Demonstration   CS-11b Sweet Lake/Willow Lake Hydrologic Restoration
LA-05 Floating Marsh Creation Demonstration   TE-36 Thin Mat Floating Marsh Enhancement Demonstration
ME-13 Freshwater Bayou Bank Stabilization   TE-18 Timbalier Island Planting Demonstration
ME-04 Freshwater Bayou Wetland Protection   CS-19 West Hackberry Vegetative Planting Demonstration
PO-06 Fritchie Marsh Restoration   BA-47 West Pointe a la Hache Marsh Creation
BA-02 GIWW (Gulf Intracoastal Waterway) to Clovelly Hydrologic Restoration   BA-04c West Pointe a la Hache Outfall Management
CS-30 GIWW - Perry Ridge West Bank Stabilization   BS-12 White Ditch Resurrection and Outfall Management
TE-43 GIWW Bank Restoration of Critical Areas in Terrebonne   LA-16 Non-Rock Alternatives to Shoreline Protection Demonstration
CS-49 Cameron-Creole Freshwater Introduction   TE-66 Central Terrebonne Freshwater Enhancement
PO-34 Alligator Bend Marsh Restoration and Shore Protection   ME-31 Freshwater Bayou Marsh Creation
TV-21 East Marsh Island Marsh Creation   PO-75 LaBranche East Marsh Creation
 LA-39 Coastwide Vegetative Plantings   CS-53 Kelso Bayou Marsh Creation
PO-133 LaBranche Central Marsh Creation   TE-112 North Catfish Lake Marsh Creation

 


 

Current Status of Coastal Wetland Plants Research and Restoration Efforts

The following proceedings are from the November 14, 2008 Symposium on Current Status of Coastal Wetland Plants Research and Restoration Efforts. Coastal wetland disappearance has been a major issue in Louisiana for more than a decade. Efforts are underway to develop superior and highly adaptive native coastal plants, seed-based technologies for large-scale restoration, and innovative engineering revegetation techniques. These plant-based products and revegetation technologies are being developed by several laboratories and could be tailored into current construction engineering to develop more successful coastal wetland loss remediation. The magnitude of Louisiana coastal marsh loss is unprecedented and occurs at the estimated rates of 65-91 km2 annually, representing 80% of the entire coastal wetland loss in the United States. For the complete proceedings please follow the link below.

 

...More Info

For more information on CWPPRA please visit LaCoast.gov
 

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