Skip

News Release

Restoring a Vital Habitat - Longleaf Pine Forests

 
Conservation Priority Report Louisiana

NRCS LAUSDACivil RightsCareersOffice LocatorContact Us
Helping People Help the Land

10.11.2011
Restoring a Vital Habitat
Longleaf Pine Forests
Longleaf pine forests once covered 60 to 90 million acres throughout the southeastern United States.  Today, only 3 to 5 million acres of this vital habitat remain.

The longleaf pine forest provides habitat for as many as 300 different species of groundcover plants and approximately 60 percent of the amphibian and reptile species found in the southeastern part of the United States. Additionally, these forests are home to at least 122 endangered or threatened plant and animal species, including the fox squirrel, northern bobwhite, red-cockaded woodpecker, and gopher tortoise.
NRCS Longleaf Pine Initiative
To help sustain, enhance, and restore longleaf pine forests, USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) Longleaf Pine Initiative offers assistance through the Wildlife Habitat Incentives Program to help private landowners restore and manage longleaf pine forests.  Nine states are included in the Longleaf Pine Initiative: Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Texas, and Virginia.

The Longleaf Pine Initiative incorporates both technical and financial assistance to help landowners in Louisiana improve habitat on agricultural land, nonindustrial private forest, and Tribal land.
Financial Assistance to implement Conservation Practices
Approved participants will receive financial assistance for implementing conservation practices including planting longleaf pine, implementing site preparation, installing firebreaks, conducting prescribed burning, and controlling invasive plants.
Contact Us
For more information on the Longleaf Pine Initiative, contact your local Natural Resources Conservation Service office or Soil and Water Conservation District.

 

 

United States Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service

 
Longleaf pine forests once covered
60 to 90 million acres from
West Virginia to Texas.
In Louisiana, only a small fraction of the original 6 million acres of longleaf pine forests still exists, with the majority of that being on the Kisatchie National Forest.
There are 6 million acres in Louisiana that have soils suitable for longleaf restoration.
62 species of animals classified as Species of Conservation Concern occur in Louisiana’s 4 longleaf pine habitat types.
Establishment and management of longleaf pine will benefit a large array of endangered and threatened plant and animal species, as well as popular game species such as white-tailed deer, Northern bobwhite quail, and the Eastern wild turkey. 

Commitment to Equality
USDA believes every farmer and rancher should be treated equally and fairly, and we are committed to resolving all cases involving allegations of past discrimination by individuals.

Referral Guide for USDA Settlements and Claims Adjudication Process

USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Women and Hispanic Farmers and Ranchers Claims Adjudication Process
If you believe that USDA improperly denied farm loan benefits to you for certain time periods between 1981 and 2000 because you are a female or because you are Hispanic, you may be eligible to apply for compensation.  To request a claims package by telephone, call 1-888-508-4429.  To request a claims package online, please visit www.farmerclaims.gov

Native American Farmer and Rancher Class Action Settlement (Keepseagle v. Vilsack)
If you are a Native American who was denied a farm loan or loan servicing by the USDA between January 1, 1981, and November 24, 1999, you may be eligible for benefits from a Class Action Settlement.  To request a claims package by telephone, call:  1-888-233-5506.  To request a claims package online, or for more information, please visit:  www.indianfarmclass.com

African American Farmer and Rancher Class Action Settlement (Pigford II)
If you are an African American farmer (a) who submitted a request to file a late claim on or between October 13, 1999, and June 18, 2008, under the 1999 USDA settlement in the earlier class action known as Pigford v. Glickman ("Pigford") and (b) who did not receive a merits determination on your discrimination claim, you may be eligible for benefits from a Class Action Settlement.  To hear information by telephone, call 1-866-950-5547 or 1-866-472-7826.  To find information online, please visit:  www.blackfarmercase.com

USDA NRCS Access Opportunity Equity Partnerships

To find out more about this conservation opportunity and more, contact your local USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service:  Office Locator