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Telfair County Success Stories

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EQIP Improves Grazing on the Family Farm               

Adam Graham and his wife, Erlene, own and operate a family cattle operation in the China Hill community. They are natives of Telfair County and have two sons and a daughter. The Grahams started their farm in 1985 when his mother gave him three cows. The herd has now grown to approximately 100. They raise Brangus Beefmaster with no horns.

They have a Texas Longhorn that they call their mascot. Several other breeds are included in the herd such as Angus, Limousine and White Face. The pastures have been overseeded for years with small grain. After attending a public meeting in McRae, they decided to apply for the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) to help improve their grazing operation. The Grahams currently manage two hundred acres under the EQIP program.

Recently, fifteen acres of pastureland was planted in Tift 85 Bermuda. Other practices planned on this farm include cross fencing, exclusion fencing to fence out wetlands, well installation, watering facilities, and heavy use areas around the watering facilities. The cows were previously watering out of the pond; therefore, the troughs will provide an alternative water source to improve water quality.

A prescribed grazing plan will also be included that will be maintained for the life of the contract. Keith Granger, Soil Conservation Technician, Bo Bannister, District Conservationist, and Jaime Walsh, County Employee. have assisted in developing the EQIP contract and providing technical assistance as needed. Congratulations to the group for their joint effort in applying conservation to the land and protecting a beautiful area of our state.

EQIP Improves Grazing on the Family Farm Adam Graham and his wife, Erlene, own and operate a family cattle operation in the China Hill community. They are natives of Telfair County and have two sons and a daughter. The Grahams started their farm in 1985 when his mother gave him three cows. The herd has now grown to approximately 100. They raise Brangus Beefmaster with no horns. They have a Texas Longhorn that they call their mascot. Several other breeds are included in the herd such as Angus, Limousine and White Face. The pastures have been overseeded for years with small grain.

After attending a public meeting in McRae, they decided to apply for the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) to help improve their grazing operation. The Grahams currently manage two hundred acres under the EQIP program. Recently, fifteen acres of pastureland was planted in Tift 85 Bermuda. Other practices planned on this farm include cross fencing, exclusion fencing to fence out wetlands, well installation, watering facilities, and heavy use areas around the watering facilities.

The cows were previously watering out of the pond; therefore, the troughs will provide an alternative water source to improve water quality. A prescribed grazing plan will also be included that will be maintained for the life of the contract. Keith Granger, Soil Conservation Technician, Bo Bannister, District Conservationist, and Jaime Walsh, County Employee. have assisted in developing the EQIP contract and providing technical assistance as needed. Congratulations to the group for their joint effort in applying conservation to the land and protecting a beautiful area of our state.

Adam Graham and his wife, Erlene, own and operate a family cattle operation in the China Hill community. They are natives of Telfair County and have two sons and a daughter. The Grahams started their farm in 1985 when his mother gave him three cows. The herd has now grown to approximately 100. They raise Brangus Beefmaster with no horns. They have a Texas Longhorn that they call their mascot. Several other breeds are included in the herd such as Angus, Limousine and White Face.

The pastures have been overseeded for years with small grain. After attending a public meeting in McRae, they decided to apply for the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) to help improve their grazing operation. The Grahams currently manage two hundred acres under the EQIP program. Recently, fifteen acres of pastureland was planted in Tift 85 Bermuda. Other practices planned on this farm include cross fencing, exclusion fencing to fence out wetlands, well installation, watering facilities, and heavy use areas around the watering facilities.

The cows were previously watering out of the pond; therefore, the troughs will provide an alternative water source to improve water quality. A prescribed grazing plan will also be included that will be maintained for the life of the contract. Keith Granger, Soil Conservation Technician, Bo Bannister, District Conservationist, and Jaime Walsh, County Employee. have assisted in developing the EQIP contract and providing technical assistance as needed.

Congratulations to the group for their joint effort in applying conservation to the land and protecting a beautiful area of our state.

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