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Black Emphasis Program

Art Walker, Black Emphasis Program Manager (BEPM)

The Special Emphasis Programs are created to improve the recruitment, job retention, and advancement opportunities of minorities, women and people with disabilities in the workplace. Special Emphasis Programs promote fairness and equity in the delivery of programs to our customers. They also help to educate our workforce about diversity among various races, genders, ethnic, and cultural groups so everyone has a better understanding and appreciation of our differences.

Black Emphasis Program (BEP) - The purpose of this program is to provide focus on issues such as equal program delivery and employment, promotion, training and career enhancement affecting Black employees and applicants in NRCS.


2014 Black History Month: “Civil Rights in America”

The Revolutionary American Thomas Paine held that “civil rights are those which appertain to man in right of his being a member of society.” From the beginning of our Republic, free people of African descent have seen themselves as citizens, members of society, and therefore due equal rights. From the nation’s origins, Americans believed that religion should not be a basis for abridging a citizen’s rights, but very few believed color should be treated similarly. And gender and sexual orientation were not even open for discussion. The resulting struggles over civil rights have remade our nation for more than two centuries.

The history of civil rights in the United States is largely the story of free people of color and then African Americans to define and enumerate what rights pertain to citizens in civil society. It has been the history of enlisting political parties to recognize the need for our governments, state and federal, to codify and protect those rights. Through the years, people of African descent have formed organizations and movements to promote equal rights. The Colored Convention Movement, the Afro­American League, the Niagara Movement, the National Council of Negro Women, and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference carried the banner of equality when allies were few. In the modern era, integrated organizations such as the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, the National Urban League, and the Congress of Racial Equality fought for and protected equal rights. The names of America’s greatest advocates of social justice—Frederick
Douglass, W. E. B. Du Bois, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Fanny Lou Hamer — are associated with the struggle for civil rights.

Within this struggle for civil rights, many of the important leaders have been men and women whose rights as women and as members of the gay and lesbian community were subordinated to the general cause. Pauli
Murray, Bayard Rustin, James Baldwin, and many others litigated, organized, and wrote on behalf of civil rights, believing fully in the path towards equal rights for all. Their struggles accentuate the universality of the movement for equality in America, and form a central part of the 2014 National African American History theme. This theme marks the 50th anniversary of the 1964 Civil Rights Act.
The Revolutionary American Thomas Paine held that “civil rights are those which appertain to man in right of his being a member of society.” From the beginning of our Republic, free people of African descent have seen themselves as citizens, members of society, and therefore due equal rights. From the nation’s origins, Americans believed that religion should not be a basis for abridging a citizen’s rights, but very few believed color should be treated similarly. And gender and sexual orientation were not even open for discussion. The resulting struggles over civil rights have remade our nation for more than two centuries.

The history of civil rights in the United States is largely the story of free people of color and then African Americans to define and enumerate what rights pertain to citizens in civil society. It has been the history of enlisting political parties to recognize the need for our governments, state and federal, to codify and protect those rights. Through the years, people of African descent have formed organizations and movements to promote equal rights. The Colored Convention Movement, the Afro­American League, the Niagara Movement, the National Council of Negro Women, and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference carried the banner of equality when allies were few. In the modern era, integrated organizations such as the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, the National Urban League, and the Congress of Racial Equality fought for and protected equal rights. The names of America’s greatest advocates of social justice—Frederick
Douglass, W. E. B. Du Bois, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Fanny Lou Hamer — are associated with the struggle for civil rights.

Within this struggle for civil rights, many of the important leaders have been men and women whose rights as women and as members of the gay and lesbian community were subordinated to the general cause. Pauli
Murray, Bayard Rustin, James Baldwin, and many others litigated, organized, and wrote on behalf of civil rights, believing fully in the path towards equal rights for all. Their struggles accentuate the universality of the movement for equality in America, and form a central part of the 2014 National African American History theme. This theme marks the 50th anniversary of the 1964 Civil Rights Act.

Headlines of the Los Angeles Times: July 3, 1964

Civil rights Bill of 1964

Civil Rights Poster

Image of President JFK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Civil Rights Act of 1968

 

Civil Rights Act of 1968

 


 

Black History

Rosa Parks Day of Courage

On December 1, 1955, Rosa Parks, a 42-year-old African American woman who worked as a seamstress, inspired a social movement when she refused to give up her seat to a white man on a Montgomery, Ala., city bus. That singular act of courage helped ignite the modern civil rights movement and a new era in the quest for freedom and equality for all Americans. Rosa Parks started a protest that was felt throughout the United States, and ultimately around the world.  Her quiet, courageous act changed America and redirected the course of history. She has been called the "Mother of the Modern-Day Civil Rights Movement." 

The Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, Michigan, will acknowledge Rosa Parks’ 100th birthday and her inspiring life through the observance of a National Day of Courage on Feb. 4, 2013.  The occasion is designed to inspire every American to take a stand and commit to engage in a courageous act that leads to positive social change—as Mrs. Parks did back on that now historic day in 1955.

The day-long celebration will feature a variety of events, including nationally-recognized speakers, live music, and dramatic presentations. Among the scheduled speakers are civil rights activist Julian Bond, Parks biographers Jeanne Theoharis and Douglas Brinkley.  Also scheduled to speak is Danielle McGuire, Wayne State University faculty member and author of the award-winning  book, “At the Dark End of the Street:  Black Women, Rape and Resistance—a New History of the Civil Rights Movement from Rosa parks to the Rise of Black Power.”

The U.S. Postal Service will also recognize Mrs. Parks’ extraordinary life by unveiling the Rosa Parks Forever Stamp during a special First-Day-of-Issue dedication ceremony at The Henry Ford Museum, also on February 4th.

2013 100th Anniversary of Rosa Parks Birth


Black Farmers

Adobe Acrobat Document2007 Census of Agriculture - Black Farmers

 


African American Informational Links